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Distress and coping in cancer patients: feasibility of the Icelandic version of BSI 18 and the WOC-CA questionnaires.

Hjörleifsdottir, Elisabet LU ; Hallberg, I R ; Bolmsjö, Ingrid LU and Gunnarsdóttir, E D (2006) In European Journal of Cancer Care 15(1). p.80-89
Abstract
The aim of this study was to test the feasibility of two instruments within an Icelandic context, the Brief Symptom Inventory 18 (BSI 18) and the Ways of Coping Inventory – Cancer Version (WOC-CA) with specific focus on gender and type of treatment and coping techniques among cancer patients during time of treatment. The sample consisted of 40 cancer patients in three oncology outpatient clinics in Iceland, 53% were women and 47% men. The majority of the participants belonged to the age group 51–70. Cronbach alpha, means, confidence intervals and standard deviations were used for analysis as well as Mann–Whitney U-test for testing differences between genders in relation to psychological distress and coping. Anxiety was the factor causing... (More)
The aim of this study was to test the feasibility of two instruments within an Icelandic context, the Brief Symptom Inventory 18 (BSI 18) and the Ways of Coping Inventory – Cancer Version (WOC-CA) with specific focus on gender and type of treatment and coping techniques among cancer patients during time of treatment. The sample consisted of 40 cancer patients in three oncology outpatient clinics in Iceland, 53% were women and 47% men. The majority of the participants belonged to the age group 51–70. Cronbach alpha, means, confidence intervals and standard deviations were used for analysis as well as Mann–Whitney U-test for testing differences between genders in relation to psychological distress and coping. Anxiety was the factor causing the greatest distress, mainly reported by patients receiving chemotherapy. More women experienced depression than men, women (18.4%), men (8.3%). Distancing was the most frequently reported coping strategy, and men seemed to focus on the positive side more often than women did (P < 0.01). Although the results should be approached with caution, as the sample size was small, they do provide support for the strength of the measurements. Also the findings indicate that gender differences should be taken into account. (Less)
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author
; ; and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
European Journal of Cancer Care
volume
15
issue
1
pages
80 - 89
publisher
John Wiley and Sons
external identifiers
  • wos:000234974400010
  • scopus:33645104554
  • pmid:16441681
ISSN
1365-2354
DOI
10.1111/j.1365-2354.2005.00620.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
additional info
The information about affiliations in this record was updated in December 2015. The record was previously connected to the following departments: Department of Clinical Sciences, Malmö (013240000), Division of Gerontology and Caring Sciences (Closed 2012) (013220200), Caring Sciences (Closed 2012) (016514020)
id
523217f9-d71c-4da4-828d-8e3b7de31002 (old id 150065)
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 11:52:31
date last changed
2021-05-26 02:48:14
@article{523217f9-d71c-4da4-828d-8e3b7de31002,
  abstract     = {The aim of this study was to test the feasibility of two instruments within an Icelandic context, the Brief Symptom Inventory 18 (BSI 18) and the Ways of Coping Inventory – Cancer Version (WOC-CA) with specific focus on gender and type of treatment and coping techniques among cancer patients during time of treatment. The sample consisted of 40 cancer patients in three oncology outpatient clinics in Iceland, 53% were women and 47% men. The majority of the participants belonged to the age group 51–70. Cronbach alpha, means, confidence intervals and standard deviations were used for analysis as well as Mann–Whitney U-test for testing differences between genders in relation to psychological distress and coping. Anxiety was the factor causing the greatest distress, mainly reported by patients receiving chemotherapy. More women experienced depression than men, women (18.4%), men (8.3%). Distancing was the most frequently reported coping strategy, and men seemed to focus on the positive side more often than women did (P &lt; 0.01). Although the results should be approached with caution, as the sample size was small, they do provide support for the strength of the measurements. Also the findings indicate that gender differences should be taken into account.},
  author       = {Hjörleifsdottir, Elisabet and Hallberg, I R and Bolmsjö, Ingrid and Gunnarsdóttir, E D},
  issn         = {1365-2354},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {80--89},
  publisher    = {John Wiley and Sons},
  series       = {European Journal of Cancer Care},
  title        = {Distress and coping in cancer patients: feasibility of the Icelandic version of BSI 18 and the WOC-CA questionnaires.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2354.2005.00620.x},
  doi          = {10.1111/j.1365-2354.2005.00620.x},
  volume       = {15},
  year         = {2006},
}