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Many genetically defined ABO subgroups exhibit characteristic flow cytometric patterns.

Hult, Annika LU and Olsson, Martin L LU (2010) In Transfusion 50. p.308-323
Abstract
BACKGROUND: A flow cytometric method for detection of low levels of A/B antigen had been developed previously in our laboratory. The aim of this study was to investigate if this approach could be utilized to characterize different ABO subgroups and constitute a useful tool in a reference laboratory. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Blood samples causing ABO discrepancies (n = 94) by routine serology were further analyzed by ABO genotyping and flow cytometry. To verify the specificity of the monoclonal anti-A and -B reagents and to establish normal flow cytometric patterns, samples from 80 blood donors with common phenotypes were also assessed. RESULTS: Distinguishable flow cytometric patterns were detected for several subgroups but were more... (More)
BACKGROUND: A flow cytometric method for detection of low levels of A/B antigen had been developed previously in our laboratory. The aim of this study was to investigate if this approach could be utilized to characterize different ABO subgroups and constitute a useful tool in a reference laboratory. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Blood samples causing ABO discrepancies (n = 94) by routine serology were further analyzed by ABO genotyping and flow cytometry. To verify the specificity of the monoclonal anti-A and -B reagents and to establish normal flow cytometric patterns, samples from 80 blood donors with common phenotypes were also assessed. RESULTS: Distinguishable flow cytometric patterns were detected for several subgroups but were more apparent for A(weak) (n = 80) samples than B(weak) (n = 14). Two subgroups, A(finn) (n = 11) and A(3) (n = 10) displayed diagnostic features and were used to establish reproduciblity over time and between donors. In general, the consistency within subgroups was remarkable. The allelic enhancement phenomenon was clearly visualized among A(x) samples (n = 10) where different alleles in trans resulted in high, low, or no A antigen expression. Nonsubgroup samples including O/A and O/B chimeras or A(h) and B(h) para-Bombay phenotypes displayed clearly distinguishable histograms. Samples from pregnant women (n = 10) displayed acquired A antigen loss, apparently accentuated during the third trimester. CONCLUSIONS: Genetically defined ABO subgroups and other anomalous phenotypes displayed flow cytometric profiles that may contribute valuable information to the investigation of ABO discrepancies. We conclude that the presented assay may complement traditional serology and genetic analysis in the reference laboratory setting. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Transfusion
volume
50
pages
308 - 323
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000274184300007
  • pmid:19804572
  • scopus:75749145064
ISSN
1537-2995
DOI
10.1111/j.1537-2995.2009.02398.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
17456b34-67f9-4c73-a44f-f923e62e3704 (old id 1500659)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19804572?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2009-11-04 10:41:08
date last changed
2017-09-17 08:39:51
@article{17456b34-67f9-4c73-a44f-f923e62e3704,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND: A flow cytometric method for detection of low levels of A/B antigen had been developed previously in our laboratory. The aim of this study was to investigate if this approach could be utilized to characterize different ABO subgroups and constitute a useful tool in a reference laboratory. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Blood samples causing ABO discrepancies (n = 94) by routine serology were further analyzed by ABO genotyping and flow cytometry. To verify the specificity of the monoclonal anti-A and -B reagents and to establish normal flow cytometric patterns, samples from 80 blood donors with common phenotypes were also assessed. RESULTS: Distinguishable flow cytometric patterns were detected for several subgroups but were more apparent for A(weak) (n = 80) samples than B(weak) (n = 14). Two subgroups, A(finn) (n = 11) and A(3) (n = 10) displayed diagnostic features and were used to establish reproduciblity over time and between donors. In general, the consistency within subgroups was remarkable. The allelic enhancement phenomenon was clearly visualized among A(x) samples (n = 10) where different alleles in trans resulted in high, low, or no A antigen expression. Nonsubgroup samples including O/A and O/B chimeras or A(h) and B(h) para-Bombay phenotypes displayed clearly distinguishable histograms. Samples from pregnant women (n = 10) displayed acquired A antigen loss, apparently accentuated during the third trimester. CONCLUSIONS: Genetically defined ABO subgroups and other anomalous phenotypes displayed flow cytometric profiles that may contribute valuable information to the investigation of ABO discrepancies. We conclude that the presented assay may complement traditional serology and genetic analysis in the reference laboratory setting.},
  author       = {Hult, Annika and Olsson, Martin L},
  issn         = {1537-2995},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {308--323},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Transfusion},
  title        = {Many genetically defined ABO subgroups exhibit characteristic flow cytometric patterns.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1537-2995.2009.02398.x},
  volume       = {50},
  year         = {2010},
}