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No Increased Occurrence of Ischemic Heart Disease Prior to the Onset of Rheumatoid Arthritis Results From Two Swedish Population-Based Rheumatoid Arthritis Cohorts

Holmqvist, Marie E.; Wedren, Sara; Jacobsson, Lennart LU ; Klareskog, Lars; Nyberg, Fredrik; Rantapaa-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Alfredsson, Lars and Askling, Johan (2009) In Arthritis and Rheumatism 60(10). p.2861-2869
Abstract
Objective. To investigate the relative importance of shared etiologies for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and ischemic heart disease (IHD) in terms of the well-known increased risk of HID in patients with RA, by assessing the occurrence of IHD up until the time of the onset of the first symptoms of RA. Methods. We assessed the prevalence of a history of IHD, myocardial infarction (MI), and angina pectoris before the onset of RA symptoms in 2 large population-based case-control studies. Patients with newly diagnosed RA according to the criteria of the American College of Rheumatology were included as cases. We used data from the Swedish Early Arthritis Register study and the Swedish Epidemiologic Investigation of Rheumatoid Arthritis... (More)
Objective. To investigate the relative importance of shared etiologies for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and ischemic heart disease (IHD) in terms of the well-known increased risk of HID in patients with RA, by assessing the occurrence of IHD up until the time of the onset of the first symptoms of RA. Methods. We assessed the prevalence of a history of IHD, myocardial infarction (MI), and angina pectoris before the onset of RA symptoms in 2 large population-based case-control studies. Patients with newly diagnosed RA according to the criteria of the American College of Rheumatology were included as cases. We used data from the Swedish Early Arthritis Register study and the Swedish Epidemiologic Investigation of Rheumatoid Arthritis case-control study and from general population controls. Information on IHD, MI, and angina pectoris was obtained from the nationwide Hospital Discharge Register and from self reports. We calculated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) to compare the prevalence of a history of IHD/Mi/angina pectoris among patients with RA with that among population controls. Results. We could not detect any increased occurrence of IHD, MI, or angina pectoris before the onset of symptoms of RA, regardless of whether data on IHD were obtained from the Hospital Discharge Register or were self reported. As detected in the Hospital Discharge Register, the OR for IHD overall was 1.0 (95% CI 0.9-1.1), the OR for MI was 1.0 (95% CI 0.9-1.1), and the OR for angina pectoris was 1.0 (95% CI 0.9-1.2). Conclusion. Shared risk factors or susceptibilities for RA and IHD are likely to contribute less than RA-related factors to the increased occurrence of IHD in patients with manifest RA. Nonetheless, the existence of shared factors associated with longer latency until the occurrence of IHD cannot be excluded. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Arthritis and Rheumatism
volume
60
issue
10
pages
2861 - 2869
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • wos:000270696600003
  • scopus:70349779378
ISSN
1529-0131
DOI
10.1002/art.24855
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
5ff371fe-1ef2-4fb7-bc9d-ddf7ec1403bb (old id 1507620)
date added to LUP
2009-11-20 11:37:10
date last changed
2017-11-12 03:25:53
@article{5ff371fe-1ef2-4fb7-bc9d-ddf7ec1403bb,
  abstract     = {Objective. To investigate the relative importance of shared etiologies for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and ischemic heart disease (IHD) in terms of the well-known increased risk of HID in patients with RA, by assessing the occurrence of IHD up until the time of the onset of the first symptoms of RA. Methods. We assessed the prevalence of a history of IHD, myocardial infarction (MI), and angina pectoris before the onset of RA symptoms in 2 large population-based case-control studies. Patients with newly diagnosed RA according to the criteria of the American College of Rheumatology were included as cases. We used data from the Swedish Early Arthritis Register study and the Swedish Epidemiologic Investigation of Rheumatoid Arthritis case-control study and from general population controls. Information on IHD, MI, and angina pectoris was obtained from the nationwide Hospital Discharge Register and from self reports. We calculated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) to compare the prevalence of a history of IHD/Mi/angina pectoris among patients with RA with that among population controls. Results. We could not detect any increased occurrence of IHD, MI, or angina pectoris before the onset of symptoms of RA, regardless of whether data on IHD were obtained from the Hospital Discharge Register or were self reported. As detected in the Hospital Discharge Register, the OR for IHD overall was 1.0 (95% CI 0.9-1.1), the OR for MI was 1.0 (95% CI 0.9-1.1), and the OR for angina pectoris was 1.0 (95% CI 0.9-1.2). Conclusion. Shared risk factors or susceptibilities for RA and IHD are likely to contribute less than RA-related factors to the increased occurrence of IHD in patients with manifest RA. Nonetheless, the existence of shared factors associated with longer latency until the occurrence of IHD cannot be excluded.},
  author       = {Holmqvist, Marie E. and Wedren, Sara and Jacobsson, Lennart and Klareskog, Lars and Nyberg, Fredrik and Rantapaa-Dahlqvist, Solbritt and Alfredsson, Lars and Askling, Johan},
  issn         = {1529-0131},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {10},
  pages        = {2861--2869},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Arthritis and Rheumatism},
  title        = {No Increased Occurrence of Ischemic Heart Disease Prior to the Onset of Rheumatoid Arthritis Results From Two Swedish Population-Based Rheumatoid Arthritis Cohorts},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/art.24855},
  volume       = {60},
  year         = {2009},
}