Advanced

Molecularly imprinted polymers

Kempe, Henrik LU and Kempe, Maria LU (2008) In The power of functional resins in organic chemistry p.15-44
Abstract
Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are man-made polymeric materials with molecular recognition abilities. The polymers mimic the molecular recognition of natural molecular recognition elements, such as receptors and antibodies, by binding target molecules in a highly selective manner. The interactions between MIPs and their targets are of non-covalent or covalent nature, or a mixture thereof. Furthermore, metal ion mediated recognition can be applied to target molecules carrying chelating moieties. The recognition of MIPs originates from the spatial orientation and fixation of polymer building blocks (i.e., monomers and cross-linkers) around a template during the polymerization. MIPs have traditionally been synthesized as monolithic... (More)
Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are man-made polymeric materials with molecular recognition abilities. The polymers mimic the molecular recognition of natural molecular recognition elements, such as receptors and antibodies, by binding target molecules in a highly selective manner. The interactions between MIPs and their targets are of non-covalent or covalent nature, or a mixture thereof. Furthermore, metal ion mediated recognition can be applied to target molecules carrying chelating moieties. The recognition of MIPs originates from the spatial orientation and fixation of polymer building blocks (i.e., monomers and cross-linkers) around a template during the polymerization. MIPs have traditionally been synthesized as monolithic polymers that are ground and sieved to an appropriate size fraction. More recently, methods to synthesize MIPs in the shape of spherical beads have been reported. Films and membranes are other attractive formats of MIPs. The design of MIPs involves a large number of variables, such as the choice of monomers and cross-linkers and their molar ratios. Statistical experimental design, multivariate data analysis, and computational approaches are valuable tools in the optimization of the MIP formulation. Characterization of MIPs includes evaluation of the binding as well as the physical properties. The applications of MIPs are exemplified by their use in chromatography and solid-phase extraction, sorbent assays, sensors, and catalysis. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
keywords
molecular recognition, synthetic polymer, template, molecular imprinting
in
The power of functional resins in organic chemistry
editor
Tulla-Puch, Judit; Albericio, Fernando; and
pages
15 - 44
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • scopus:84889769039
ISBN
978-3-527-31936-7
DOI
10.1002/9783527626175.ch2
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
aa8a3d7a-321d-4e4f-8244-ada44dec01e5 (old id 1516028)
date added to LUP
2009-12-17 09:59:27
date last changed
2017-01-01 07:57:41
@inbook{aa8a3d7a-321d-4e4f-8244-ada44dec01e5,
  abstract     = {Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are man-made polymeric materials with molecular recognition abilities. The polymers mimic the molecular recognition of natural molecular recognition elements, such as receptors and antibodies, by binding target molecules in a highly selective manner. The interactions between MIPs and their targets are of non-covalent or covalent nature, or a mixture thereof. Furthermore, metal ion mediated recognition can be applied to target molecules carrying chelating moieties. The recognition of MIPs originates from the spatial orientation and fixation of polymer building blocks (i.e., monomers and cross-linkers) around a template during the polymerization. MIPs have traditionally been synthesized as monolithic polymers that are ground and sieved to an appropriate size fraction. More recently, methods to synthesize MIPs in the shape of spherical beads have been reported. Films and membranes are other attractive formats of MIPs. The design of MIPs involves a large number of variables, such as the choice of monomers and cross-linkers and their molar ratios. Statistical experimental design, multivariate data analysis, and computational approaches are valuable tools in the optimization of the MIP formulation. Characterization of MIPs includes evaluation of the binding as well as the physical properties. The applications of MIPs are exemplified by their use in chromatography and solid-phase extraction, sorbent assays, sensors, and catalysis.},
  author       = {Kempe, Henrik and Kempe, Maria},
  editor       = {Tulla-Puch, Judit and Albericio, Fernando},
  isbn         = {978-3-527-31936-7},
  keyword      = {molecular recognition,synthetic polymer,template,molecular imprinting},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {15--44},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {The power of functional resins in organic chemistry},
  title        = {Molecularly imprinted polymers},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/9783527626175.ch2},
  year         = {2008},
}