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Health effects of residential wood smoke particles: the importance of combustion conditions and physicochemical particle properties

Bolling, Anette Kocbach; Pagels, Joakim LU ; Yttri, Karl Espen; Barregard, Lars; Sallsten, Gerd; Schwarze, Per E. and Boman, Christoffer (2009) In Particle and Fibre Toxicology 6.
Abstract
Background: Residential wood combustion is now recognized as a major particle source in many developed countries, and the number of studies investigating the negative health effects associated with wood smoke exposure is currently increasing. The combustion appliances in use today provide highly variable combustion conditions resulting in large variations in the physicochemical characteristics of the emitted particles. These differences in physicochemical properties are likely to influence the biological effects induced by the wood smoke particles. Outline: The focus of this review is to discuss the present knowledge on physicochemical properties of wood smoke particles from different combustion conditions in relation to wood smoke-induced... (More)
Background: Residential wood combustion is now recognized as a major particle source in many developed countries, and the number of studies investigating the negative health effects associated with wood smoke exposure is currently increasing. The combustion appliances in use today provide highly variable combustion conditions resulting in large variations in the physicochemical characteristics of the emitted particles. These differences in physicochemical properties are likely to influence the biological effects induced by the wood smoke particles. Outline: The focus of this review is to discuss the present knowledge on physicochemical properties of wood smoke particles from different combustion conditions in relation to wood smoke-induced health effects. In addition, the human wood smoke exposure in developed countries is explored in order to identify the particle characteristics that are relevant for experimental studies of wood smoke-induced health effects. Finally, recent experimental studies regarding wood smoke exposure are discussed with respect to the applied combustion conditions and particle properties. Conclusion: Overall, the reviewed literature regarding the physicochemical properties of wood smoke particles provides a relatively clear picture of how these properties vary with the combustion conditions, whereas particle emissions from specific classes of combustion appliances are less well characterised. The major gaps in knowledge concern; (i) characterisation of the atmospheric transformations of wood smoke particles, (ii) characterisation of the physicochemical properties of wood smoke particles in ambient and indoor environments, and (iii) identification of the physicochemical properties that influence the biological effects of wood smoke particles. (Less)
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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Particle and Fibre Toxicology
volume
6
publisher
BioMed Central
external identifiers
  • wos:000272288100001
  • scopus:77649143954
ISSN
1743-8977
DOI
10.1186/1743-8977-6-29
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
59afd0e6-2a34-49e7-91b4-5427f3df8325 (old id 1517621)
date added to LUP
2010-01-04 16:24:26
date last changed
2017-12-17 03:37:16
@article{59afd0e6-2a34-49e7-91b4-5427f3df8325,
  abstract     = {Background: Residential wood combustion is now recognized as a major particle source in many developed countries, and the number of studies investigating the negative health effects associated with wood smoke exposure is currently increasing. The combustion appliances in use today provide highly variable combustion conditions resulting in large variations in the physicochemical characteristics of the emitted particles. These differences in physicochemical properties are likely to influence the biological effects induced by the wood smoke particles. Outline: The focus of this review is to discuss the present knowledge on physicochemical properties of wood smoke particles from different combustion conditions in relation to wood smoke-induced health effects. In addition, the human wood smoke exposure in developed countries is explored in order to identify the particle characteristics that are relevant for experimental studies of wood smoke-induced health effects. Finally, recent experimental studies regarding wood smoke exposure are discussed with respect to the applied combustion conditions and particle properties. Conclusion: Overall, the reviewed literature regarding the physicochemical properties of wood smoke particles provides a relatively clear picture of how these properties vary with the combustion conditions, whereas particle emissions from specific classes of combustion appliances are less well characterised. The major gaps in knowledge concern; (i) characterisation of the atmospheric transformations of wood smoke particles, (ii) characterisation of the physicochemical properties of wood smoke particles in ambient and indoor environments, and (iii) identification of the physicochemical properties that influence the biological effects of wood smoke particles.},
  author       = {Bolling, Anette Kocbach and Pagels, Joakim and Yttri, Karl Espen and Barregard, Lars and Sallsten, Gerd and Schwarze, Per E. and Boman, Christoffer},
  issn         = {1743-8977},
  language     = {eng},
  publisher    = {BioMed Central},
  series       = {Particle and Fibre Toxicology},
  title        = {Health effects of residential wood smoke particles: the importance of combustion conditions and physicochemical particle properties},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1743-8977-6-29},
  volume       = {6},
  year         = {2009},
}