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Optical microscopy in photosynthesis

Cisek, Richard ; Spencer, Leigh ; Prent, Nicole ; Zigmantas, Donatas LU orcid ; Espie, George S. and Barzda, Virginijus (2009) In Photosynthesis Research 102(2-3). p.111-141
Abstract
Emerging as well as the most frequently used optical microscopy techniques are reviewed and image contrast generation methods in a microscope are presented, focusing on the nonlinear contrasts such as harmonic generation and multiphoton excitation fluorescence. Nonlinear microscopy presents numerous advantages over linear microscopy techniques including improved deep tissue imaging, optical sectioning, and imaging of live unstained samples. Nonetheless, with the exception of multiphoton excitation fluorescence, nonlinear microscopy is in its infancy, lacking protocols, users and applications; hence, this review focuses on the potential of nonlinear microscopy for studying photosynthetic organisms. Examples of nonlinear microscopic imaging... (More)
Emerging as well as the most frequently used optical microscopy techniques are reviewed and image contrast generation methods in a microscope are presented, focusing on the nonlinear contrasts such as harmonic generation and multiphoton excitation fluorescence. Nonlinear microscopy presents numerous advantages over linear microscopy techniques including improved deep tissue imaging, optical sectioning, and imaging of live unstained samples. Nonetheless, with the exception of multiphoton excitation fluorescence, nonlinear microscopy is in its infancy, lacking protocols, users and applications; hence, this review focuses on the potential of nonlinear microscopy for studying photosynthetic organisms. Examples of nonlinear microscopic imaging are presented including isolated light-harvesting antenna complexes from higher plants, starch granules, chloroplasts, unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and cyanobacteria Leptolyngbya sp. and Anabaena sp. While focusing on nonlinear microscopy techniques, second and third harmonic generation and multiphoton excitation fluorescence microscopy, other emerging nonlinear imaging modalities are described and several linear optical microscopy techniques are reviewed in order to clearly describe their capabilities and to highlight the advantages of nonlinear microscopy. (Less)
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organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Chlamydomonas, generation, Third harmonic, Nonlinear microscopy, Second harmonic generation, Chloroplasts, Cyanobacteria
in
Photosynthesis Research
volume
102
issue
2-3
pages
111 - 141
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • wos:000271795400003
  • scopus:76149139412
  • pmid:19851883
ISSN
0166-8595
DOI
10.1007/s11120-009-9500-9
language
English
LU publication?
yes
additional info
The information about affiliations in this record was updated in December 2015. The record was previously connected to the following departments: Chemical Physics (S) (011001060)
id
72365148-62da-481a-96b9-9869c453a4b0 (old id 1518734)
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 14:24:22
date last changed
2021-07-21 04:38:15
@article{72365148-62da-481a-96b9-9869c453a4b0,
  abstract     = {Emerging as well as the most frequently used optical microscopy techniques are reviewed and image contrast generation methods in a microscope are presented, focusing on the nonlinear contrasts such as harmonic generation and multiphoton excitation fluorescence. Nonlinear microscopy presents numerous advantages over linear microscopy techniques including improved deep tissue imaging, optical sectioning, and imaging of live unstained samples. Nonetheless, with the exception of multiphoton excitation fluorescence, nonlinear microscopy is in its infancy, lacking protocols, users and applications; hence, this review focuses on the potential of nonlinear microscopy for studying photosynthetic organisms. Examples of nonlinear microscopic imaging are presented including isolated light-harvesting antenna complexes from higher plants, starch granules, chloroplasts, unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and cyanobacteria Leptolyngbya sp. and Anabaena sp. While focusing on nonlinear microscopy techniques, second and third harmonic generation and multiphoton excitation fluorescence microscopy, other emerging nonlinear imaging modalities are described and several linear optical microscopy techniques are reviewed in order to clearly describe their capabilities and to highlight the advantages of nonlinear microscopy.},
  author       = {Cisek, Richard and Spencer, Leigh and Prent, Nicole and Zigmantas, Donatas and Espie, George S. and Barzda, Virginijus},
  issn         = {0166-8595},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2-3},
  pages        = {111--141},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Photosynthesis Research},
  title        = {Optical microscopy in photosynthesis},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11120-009-9500-9},
  doi          = {10.1007/s11120-009-9500-9},
  volume       = {102},
  year         = {2009},
}