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The association between different cognitive domains and age in a multi-centre study of middle-aged and older European men

Lee, David M.; Tajar, Abdelouahid; Ulubaev, Aslan; Pendleton, Neil; O'Neill, Terence W.; O'Connor, Daryl B.; Bartfai, Gyorgy; Boonen, Steven; Casanueva, Felipe F. and Finn, Joseph D., et al. (2009) In International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry 24(11). p.1257-1266
Abstract
Objectives We determined levels of cognitive functioning in community dwelling men aged 40-79 (n = 3265) from eight European centres and investigated to what extent cognitive performance varied between centres, the association between different cognitive domains and age, educational level, co-morbidity and lifestyle factors and the respective contributions of centre and individual factors to cognitive performance. Methods Cognitive domains assessed were visuo-constructional ability and Visual memory (Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure test, ROCF), topographical memory (Camden Topographical Recognition Memory test, CTRM) and processing speed (Digit-Symbol Substitution test, DSST). Results There were significant between-centre differences in all... (More)
Objectives We determined levels of cognitive functioning in community dwelling men aged 40-79 (n = 3265) from eight European centres and investigated to what extent cognitive performance varied between centres, the association between different cognitive domains and age, educational level, co-morbidity and lifestyle factors and the respective contributions of centre and individual factors to cognitive performance. Methods Cognitive domains assessed were visuo-constructional ability and Visual memory (Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure test, ROCF), topographical memory (Camden Topographical Recognition Memory test, CTRM) and processing speed (Digit-Symbol Substitution test, DSST). Results There were significant between-centre differences in all four cognitive test scores. Using multilevel linear regression analysis (MLRA), age, education, depression, physical performance and smoking were independent predictors of cognitive function and these variables explained 10-13% of the variation in cognitive scores between centres and 17-36% of the variation in scores between individuals within centres. Conclusion Our data suggest that although a proportion of the variance in cognitive function among European men is explained by individual level differences, a significant proportion is due to contextual phenomenon. Such contextual factors need to be considered when analysing multi-centre data and European men should not be treated as homogeneous when assessing cognitive performance using existing instruments. Copyright (C) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. (Less)
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subject
keywords
male, population survey, ageing, epidemiology, cognitive function, health, multilevel analysis
in
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
volume
24
issue
11
pages
1257 - 1266
publisher
John Wiley and Sons Ltd
external identifiers
  • wos:000271558500011
  • scopus:70350702778
ISSN
1099-1166
DOI
10.1002/gps.2255
language
English
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yes
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836f6e95-5548-4196-b24b-66f0ec8be71d (old id 1520105)
date added to LUP
2009-12-28 10:05:23
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2017-01-01 05:16:09
@article{836f6e95-5548-4196-b24b-66f0ec8be71d,
  abstract     = {Objectives We determined levels of cognitive functioning in community dwelling men aged 40-79 (n = 3265) from eight European centres and investigated to what extent cognitive performance varied between centres, the association between different cognitive domains and age, educational level, co-morbidity and lifestyle factors and the respective contributions of centre and individual factors to cognitive performance. Methods Cognitive domains assessed were visuo-constructional ability and Visual memory (Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure test, ROCF), topographical memory (Camden Topographical Recognition Memory test, CTRM) and processing speed (Digit-Symbol Substitution test, DSST). Results There were significant between-centre differences in all four cognitive test scores. Using multilevel linear regression analysis (MLRA), age, education, depression, physical performance and smoking were independent predictors of cognitive function and these variables explained 10-13% of the variation in cognitive scores between centres and 17-36% of the variation in scores between individuals within centres. Conclusion Our data suggest that although a proportion of the variance in cognitive function among European men is explained by individual level differences, a significant proportion is due to contextual phenomenon. Such contextual factors need to be considered when analysing multi-centre data and European men should not be treated as homogeneous when assessing cognitive performance using existing instruments. Copyright (C) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.},
  author       = {Lee, David M. and Tajar, Abdelouahid and Ulubaev, Aslan and Pendleton, Neil and O'Neill, Terence W. and O'Connor, Daryl B. and Bartfai, Gyorgy and Boonen, Steven and Casanueva, Felipe F. and Finn, Joseph D. and Forti, Gianni and Giwercman, Aleksander and Han, Thang S. and Huhtaniemi, Ilpo T. and Kula, Krzysztof and Lean, Michael E. J. and Punab, Margus and Silman, Alan J. and Vanderschueren, Dirk and Wu, Frederick C. W.},
  issn         = {1099-1166},
  keyword      = {male,population survey,ageing,epidemiology,cognitive function,health,multilevel analysis},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {11},
  pages        = {1257--1266},
  publisher    = {John Wiley and Sons Ltd},
  series       = {International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry},
  title        = {The association between different cognitive domains and age in a multi-centre study of middle-aged and older European men},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/gps.2255},
  volume       = {24},
  year         = {2009},
}