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Determinants of local ant (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) species richness and activity density across Europe

Kumschick, Sabrina; Schmidt-Entling, Martin H.; Bacher, Sven; Hickler, Thomas LU ; Espadaler, Xavier and Nentwig, Wolfgang (2009) In Ecological Entomology 34(6). p.748-754
Abstract
1. Species richness is influenced by local habitat features and large-scale climatic gradients. Usually, both influences are studied in isolation because of the divergent spatial scales at which they occur. Here, we compared the influence of large-scale climate and local habitat type on European ants using a continent-wide, standardised sampling programme. 2. We investigated species richness and activity density from pitfall traps distributed over four habitat types at 17 locations from northern Sweden to Spain and Greece. Species richness and activity density were analysed with respect to ambient energy [equilibrium evapotranspiration (EET)] and productive energy (net primary productivity). Furthermore, we compared ant richness and... (More)
1. Species richness is influenced by local habitat features and large-scale climatic gradients. Usually, both influences are studied in isolation because of the divergent spatial scales at which they occur. Here, we compared the influence of large-scale climate and local habitat type on European ants using a continent-wide, standardised sampling programme. 2. We investigated species richness and activity density from pitfall traps distributed over four habitat types at 17 locations from northern Sweden to Spain and Greece. Species richness and activity density were analysed with respect to ambient energy [equilibrium evapotranspiration (EET)] and productive energy (net primary productivity). Furthermore, we compared ant richness and activity density between the four habitat types: arable land, scrubland, grassland, and forest. 3. Species richness and activity density of ants increased with equilibrium evapotranspiration (EET), explaining 30.2% of the total variation in species richness and 24.2% of activity density. Habitat type explained an additional 19.2% of the variation in species richness and 20.2% of activity density, and was not related to productivity. Species richness and activity density were highest in scrubland and significantly lower in forest and (marginally significant) in arable land. 4. The increase in EET and the decrease in forest confirms the pronounced thermophily of ants, whereas the decrease in arable land is probably caused by soil disturbance. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
habitat type, productivity, hypothesis, equilibrium evapotranspiration, gradient, diversity, disturbance, Ambient energy hypothesis, biodiversity
in
Ecological Entomology
volume
34
issue
6
pages
748 - 754
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000271495700011
  • scopus:70449442542
ISSN
1365-2311
DOI
10.1111/j.1365-2311.2009.01127.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
eb3c8566-6947-4349-aa1f-b6738a91a3a5 (old id 1520761)
date added to LUP
2009-12-28 09:28:17
date last changed
2017-01-01 05:17:50
@article{eb3c8566-6947-4349-aa1f-b6738a91a3a5,
  abstract     = {1. Species richness is influenced by local habitat features and large-scale climatic gradients. Usually, both influences are studied in isolation because of the divergent spatial scales at which they occur. Here, we compared the influence of large-scale climate and local habitat type on European ants using a continent-wide, standardised sampling programme. 2. We investigated species richness and activity density from pitfall traps distributed over four habitat types at 17 locations from northern Sweden to Spain and Greece. Species richness and activity density were analysed with respect to ambient energy [equilibrium evapotranspiration (EET)] and productive energy (net primary productivity). Furthermore, we compared ant richness and activity density between the four habitat types: arable land, scrubland, grassland, and forest. 3. Species richness and activity density of ants increased with equilibrium evapotranspiration (EET), explaining 30.2% of the total variation in species richness and 24.2% of activity density. Habitat type explained an additional 19.2% of the variation in species richness and 20.2% of activity density, and was not related to productivity. Species richness and activity density were highest in scrubland and significantly lower in forest and (marginally significant) in arable land. 4. The increase in EET and the decrease in forest confirms the pronounced thermophily of ants, whereas the decrease in arable land is probably caused by soil disturbance.},
  author       = {Kumschick, Sabrina and Schmidt-Entling, Martin H. and Bacher, Sven and Hickler, Thomas and Espadaler, Xavier and Nentwig, Wolfgang},
  issn         = {1365-2311},
  keyword      = {habitat type,productivity,hypothesis,equilibrium evapotranspiration,gradient,diversity,disturbance,Ambient energy hypothesis,biodiversity},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {748--754},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Ecological Entomology},
  title        = {Determinants of local ant (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) species richness and activity density across Europe},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2311.2009.01127.x},
  volume       = {34},
  year         = {2009},
}