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Prediction of glaucomatous visual field loss by extrapolation of linear trends.

Bengtsson, Boel LU ; Patella, Vincent Michael and Heijl, Anders LU (2009) In Archives of Ophthalmology 127(12). p.1610-1615
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate how well short-term progression rates can predict long-term visual field outcomes in patients with glaucoma. METHODS: We calculated visual field rates of progression using linear regression analysis of the Visual Field Index (VFI) for 100 consecutive patients with glaucoma having 10 or more Swedish Interactive Thresholding Algorithm standard field tests. Final VFI was predicted on the basis of linear extrapolation of the slope defined by the initial 5 field test results. Final VFI also was estimated using linear regression of all qualifying examination results for each patient. Primary outcome measures were the absolute difference and the correlation between predicted and estimated final VFI values. RESULTS:... (More)
OBJECTIVE: To investigate how well short-term progression rates can predict long-term visual field outcomes in patients with glaucoma. METHODS: We calculated visual field rates of progression using linear regression analysis of the Visual Field Index (VFI) for 100 consecutive patients with glaucoma having 10 or more Swedish Interactive Thresholding Algorithm standard field tests. Final VFI was predicted on the basis of linear extrapolation of the slope defined by the initial 5 field test results. Final VFI also was estimated using linear regression of all qualifying examination results for each patient. Primary outcome measures were the absolute difference and the correlation between predicted and estimated final VFI values. RESULTS: Patient follow-up averaged 8.2 years and 11 field examinations. Median VFI progression rate was -1.1% per year both for the initial 5 test results and also for the complete series. Seventy percent of patients had a predicted final VFI within +/-10% of the estimated final VFI, and the 2 VFI calculations had a correlation coefficient of 0.84. CONCLUSION: Linear extrapolation based on 5 initial visual field test results was a reliable predictor of future field loss in most patients. Patients in whom linear regression analysis suggests dangerously rapid rates of visual field progression may be candidates for significant alterations in therapy. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Vision Disorders: physiopathology, Vision Disorders: diagnosis, Glaucoma: diagnosis, Glaucoma: physiopathology
in
Archives of Ophthalmology
volume
127
issue
12
pages
1610 - 1615
publisher
American Medical Association
external identifiers
  • wos:000272554300009
  • pmid:20008716
  • scopus:73349094411
ISSN
0003-9950
DOI
10.1001/archophthalmol.2009.297
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
a0f045d3-bebf-45c6-b5ff-b889b6f83d40 (old id 1523599)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20008716?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2010-01-14 13:27:51
date last changed
2017-09-10 04:44:59
@article{a0f045d3-bebf-45c6-b5ff-b889b6f83d40,
  abstract     = {OBJECTIVE: To investigate how well short-term progression rates can predict long-term visual field outcomes in patients with glaucoma. METHODS: We calculated visual field rates of progression using linear regression analysis of the Visual Field Index (VFI) for 100 consecutive patients with glaucoma having 10 or more Swedish Interactive Thresholding Algorithm standard field tests. Final VFI was predicted on the basis of linear extrapolation of the slope defined by the initial 5 field test results. Final VFI also was estimated using linear regression of all qualifying examination results for each patient. Primary outcome measures were the absolute difference and the correlation between predicted and estimated final VFI values. RESULTS: Patient follow-up averaged 8.2 years and 11 field examinations. Median VFI progression rate was -1.1% per year both for the initial 5 test results and also for the complete series. Seventy percent of patients had a predicted final VFI within +/-10% of the estimated final VFI, and the 2 VFI calculations had a correlation coefficient of 0.84. CONCLUSION: Linear extrapolation based on 5 initial visual field test results was a reliable predictor of future field loss in most patients. Patients in whom linear regression analysis suggests dangerously rapid rates of visual field progression may be candidates for significant alterations in therapy.},
  author       = {Bengtsson, Boel and Patella, Vincent Michael and Heijl, Anders},
  issn         = {0003-9950},
  keyword      = {Vision Disorders: physiopathology,Vision Disorders: diagnosis,Glaucoma: diagnosis,Glaucoma: physiopathology},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {12},
  pages        = {1610--1615},
  publisher    = {American Medical Association},
  series       = {Archives of Ophthalmology},
  title        = {Prediction of glaucomatous visual field loss by extrapolation of linear trends.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/archophthalmol.2009.297},
  volume       = {127},
  year         = {2009},
}