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Investigation and evaluation of a method for determination of ethanol with the SIRE (R) Biosensor P100, using alcohol dehydrogenase as recognition element

Svensson, Katrin; Bülow, Leif LU ; Kriz, D and Krook, M (2005) In Biosensors & Bioelectronics 21(5). p.705-711
Abstract
A new method for rapid determination of ethanol was developed, using alcohol dehydrogenase as recognition element for the SIRE (R) (sensors based on injection of the recognition element) Biosensor, which is an amperometric biosensor. The method was simple, fast, accurate, specific and cost-effective. The recognition element solution used was stable at least for 24h in room temperature, and at least one month when lyophilised. The optimal potential versus the silver wire electrode, the optimal pH of the buffer and the optimal temperature of the water bath was determined to be +950 mV, 8.1 and 308 K, respectively. The optimal concentrations of alcohol dehydrogenase, BSA and NAD(+) were deterntined to be 200 U/ml, 20 mg/ml and 15 mM,... (More)
A new method for rapid determination of ethanol was developed, using alcohol dehydrogenase as recognition element for the SIRE (R) (sensors based on injection of the recognition element) Biosensor, which is an amperometric biosensor. The method was simple, fast, accurate, specific and cost-effective. The recognition element solution used was stable at least for 24h in room temperature, and at least one month when lyophilised. The optimal potential versus the silver wire electrode, the optimal pH of the buffer and the optimal temperature of the water bath was determined to be +950 mV, 8.1 and 308 K, respectively. The optimal concentrations of alcohol dehydrogenase, BSA and NAD(+) were deterntined to be 200 U/ml, 20 mg/ml and 15 mM, respectively. The total analysis time was between 50s and 4 min per analysis, depending on the concentration ran-e. The linear range was 0-12.5 mM. The detection limit was less than 0.1 mM. The repeatability (%R.S.D.) was 3-5% (n = 10). The reproducibility was 5-8% (n = 5). Methanol gave no signal at all, but higher alcohols, such as propanol, pentanol and hexanol, gave significant signals, decreasing with increasing length of the carbon chain. The price for one measurement was calculated to be 0.052 euro. The results from measurements with the biosensor were compared to those from an established analysis kit for ethanol. The results correlated well (R-2 = 0.9874). The concentration of ethanol in different alcoholic beverages was investigated and correlated well with the concentrations given by the manufacturers. (c) 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Biosensors & Bioelectronics
volume
21
issue
5
pages
705 - 711
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • pmid:16242608
  • wos:000233154300003
  • scopus:26944471661
ISSN
1873-4235
DOI
10.1016/j.bios.2005.01.001
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
cadcc70a-1809-4aac-9e01-f7465a10cdc7 (old id 152576)
date added to LUP
2007-07-17 08:16:45
date last changed
2017-01-01 07:19:32
@article{cadcc70a-1809-4aac-9e01-f7465a10cdc7,
  abstract     = {A new method for rapid determination of ethanol was developed, using alcohol dehydrogenase as recognition element for the SIRE (R) (sensors based on injection of the recognition element) Biosensor, which is an amperometric biosensor. The method was simple, fast, accurate, specific and cost-effective. The recognition element solution used was stable at least for 24h in room temperature, and at least one month when lyophilised. The optimal potential versus the silver wire electrode, the optimal pH of the buffer and the optimal temperature of the water bath was determined to be +950 mV, 8.1 and 308 K, respectively. The optimal concentrations of alcohol dehydrogenase, BSA and NAD(+) were deterntined to be 200 U/ml, 20 mg/ml and 15 mM, respectively. The total analysis time was between 50s and 4 min per analysis, depending on the concentration ran-e. The linear range was 0-12.5 mM. The detection limit was less than 0.1 mM. The repeatability (%R.S.D.) was 3-5% (n = 10). The reproducibility was 5-8% (n = 5). Methanol gave no signal at all, but higher alcohols, such as propanol, pentanol and hexanol, gave significant signals, decreasing with increasing length of the carbon chain. The price for one measurement was calculated to be 0.052 euro. The results from measurements with the biosensor were compared to those from an established analysis kit for ethanol. The results correlated well (R-2 = 0.9874). The concentration of ethanol in different alcoholic beverages was investigated and correlated well with the concentrations given by the manufacturers. (c) 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Svensson, Katrin and Bülow, Leif and Kriz, D and Krook, M},
  issn         = {1873-4235},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {705--711},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Biosensors & Bioelectronics},
  title        = {Investigation and evaluation of a method for determination of ethanol with the SIRE (R) Biosensor P100, using alcohol dehydrogenase as recognition element},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bios.2005.01.001},
  volume       = {21},
  year         = {2005},
}