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A long-term follow-up study of adolescents with conduct disorder: Can outcome be predicted from self-concept and intelligence?

Bergström, Martin LU and Hansson, Kjell LU (2009) In Nordic Journal of Psychiatry 63(6). p.454-461
Abstract
Background: This study examines Swedish young adults (age 21) with a history of conduct disorder (CD) in adolescence. Research has established CD as a condition for a range of adverse outcomes. Intelligence, aggression, parent-child conflict, parent-child relation and peer-rejection are known factors influencing the outcome. Aim: The aim of this longitudinal study is to find how self-confidence and intelligence in an inpatient group diagnosed with CD are related to health in young adulthood. Methods: The subjects were diagnosed with CD in their adolescence at the inpatient child and adolescent psychiatric unit. Using structured questionnaires as independent variables, this study uses multiple regression analysis to predict health outcomes.... (More)
Background: This study examines Swedish young adults (age 21) with a history of conduct disorder (CD) in adolescence. Research has established CD as a condition for a range of adverse outcomes. Intelligence, aggression, parent-child conflict, parent-child relation and peer-rejection are known factors influencing the outcome. Aim: The aim of this longitudinal study is to find how self-confidence and intelligence in an inpatient group diagnosed with CD are related to health in young adulthood. Methods: The subjects were diagnosed with CD in their adolescence at the inpatient child and adolescent psychiatric unit. Using structured questionnaires as independent variables, this study uses multiple regression analysis to predict health outcomes. Results: The results showed that self-concept and verbal intelligence could significantly predict health outcomes. However, in the multivariate analysis, only self-concept variables significantly predicted the outcome. The predicted outcome was small, but substantial in most models (R-2 = 0.12-0.25). Conclusion: This means that clinicians need to be humble in forecasting individual adult health among adolescents with severe CD. According to this study, it is difficult to separate positive and negative outcomes. We suggest that this structural data has better prediction potential than medical casebook data. If this is the general case, this psychometric data paves the way for more structural ways of assessing child and adolescence psychiatric problems. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Long-term follow-up, Clinical sample, Conduct disorder, Sense of, coherence
in
Nordic Journal of Psychiatry
volume
63
issue
6
pages
454 - 461
publisher
Informa Healthcare
external identifiers
  • wos:000272730500003
  • scopus:72049128332
ISSN
1502-4725
DOI
10.3109/08039480903009100
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
834264f2-8265-48eb-9ca3-d12cf68116c1 (old id 1532231)
date added to LUP
2010-01-29 11:48:56
date last changed
2017-01-01 04:59:46
@article{834264f2-8265-48eb-9ca3-d12cf68116c1,
  abstract     = {Background: This study examines Swedish young adults (age 21) with a history of conduct disorder (CD) in adolescence. Research has established CD as a condition for a range of adverse outcomes. Intelligence, aggression, parent-child conflict, parent-child relation and peer-rejection are known factors influencing the outcome. Aim: The aim of this longitudinal study is to find how self-confidence and intelligence in an inpatient group diagnosed with CD are related to health in young adulthood. Methods: The subjects were diagnosed with CD in their adolescence at the inpatient child and adolescent psychiatric unit. Using structured questionnaires as independent variables, this study uses multiple regression analysis to predict health outcomes. Results: The results showed that self-concept and verbal intelligence could significantly predict health outcomes. However, in the multivariate analysis, only self-concept variables significantly predicted the outcome. The predicted outcome was small, but substantial in most models (R-2 = 0.12-0.25). Conclusion: This means that clinicians need to be humble in forecasting individual adult health among adolescents with severe CD. According to this study, it is difficult to separate positive and negative outcomes. We suggest that this structural data has better prediction potential than medical casebook data. If this is the general case, this psychometric data paves the way for more structural ways of assessing child and adolescence psychiatric problems.},
  author       = {Bergström, Martin and Hansson, Kjell},
  issn         = {1502-4725},
  keyword      = {Long-term follow-up,Clinical sample,Conduct disorder,Sense of,coherence},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {454--461},
  publisher    = {Informa Healthcare},
  series       = {Nordic Journal of Psychiatry},
  title        = {A long-term follow-up study of adolescents with conduct disorder: Can outcome be predicted from self-concept and intelligence?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/08039480903009100},
  volume       = {63},
  year         = {2009},
}