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Resource Use and Societal Costs for Crohn's Disease in Sweden

Mesterton, Johan; Jonsson, Linus; Almer, Sven H. C.; Befrits, Ragnar; Friis-Liby, Ingalill and Lindgren, Stefan LU (2009) In Inflammatory Bowel Diseases 15(12). p.1882-1890
Abstract
Background: The usual onset of Crohn's disease (CD) is between 15 and 30 years of age, thus affecting people during their most economically productive period in life. Methods: This study intended to estimate societal costs and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in Swedish patients in different stages of CD. Cross-sectional data on disease activity (measured with the Harvey-Bradshaw Index [HBI]), direct medical resource use, work productivity, and HRQoL (assessed using the 15D instrument) were collected for 420 patients by questionnaires to patients, to the treating physician, and from medical records. Based on HBI, current treatment, and response to treatment, patients were classified into the following disease states: Remission,... (More)
Background: The usual onset of Crohn's disease (CD) is between 15 and 30 years of age, thus affecting people during their most economically productive period in life. Methods: This study intended to estimate societal costs and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in Swedish patients in different stages of CD. Cross-sectional data on disease activity (measured with the Harvey-Bradshaw Index [HBI]), direct medical resource use, work productivity, and HRQoL (assessed using the 15D instrument) were collected for 420 patients by questionnaires to patients, to the treating physician, and from medical records. Based on HBI, current treatment, and response to treatment, patients were classified into the following disease states: Remission, Response, Active, Refractory, and Surgery. Results: The average 4-week cost per patient in 2007 was estimated at (sic)721 (USD 988), of which 64% was due to lost productivity. The total 4-week cost of care was (sic)255 (USD 349) in Remission, (sic)831 (USD 1138) in Response, (sic)891 (USD 1220) in Active, (sic)1360 (USD 1864) in Refractory, and (sic)16984 (USD 23269) in Surgery. HBI was the most important predictor of costs of care-a 1-point increase in HBI increased total costs by 25% (P < 0.001). HRQoL differed between the disease states: 0.92 in Remission, 0.90 in Response, 0.82 in Active, 0.81 in Refractory, and 0.77 in Surgery. Conclusions: Patients in remission have the lowest costs and the highest HRQoL. Patients responding to treatment have lower costs of care than patients with high disease activity who are not treated or do not respond to treatment:. Thus, total costs of care might be reduced by efficient treatment. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
quality of life, Crohn's disease, costs, Harvey-Bradshaw index
in
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
volume
15
issue
12
pages
1882 - 1890
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • wos:000272568600017
  • scopus:72549089752
ISSN
1536-4844
DOI
10.1002/ibd.20939
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
be101bcd-763a-4e29-acc5-2953a8013816 (old id 1532711)
date added to LUP
2010-01-29 10:43:43
date last changed
2017-01-08 03:48:57
@article{be101bcd-763a-4e29-acc5-2953a8013816,
  abstract     = {Background: The usual onset of Crohn's disease (CD) is between 15 and 30 years of age, thus affecting people during their most economically productive period in life. Methods: This study intended to estimate societal costs and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in Swedish patients in different stages of CD. Cross-sectional data on disease activity (measured with the Harvey-Bradshaw Index [HBI]), direct medical resource use, work productivity, and HRQoL (assessed using the 15D instrument) were collected for 420 patients by questionnaires to patients, to the treating physician, and from medical records. Based on HBI, current treatment, and response to treatment, patients were classified into the following disease states: Remission, Response, Active, Refractory, and Surgery. Results: The average 4-week cost per patient in 2007 was estimated at (sic)721 (USD 988), of which 64% was due to lost productivity. The total 4-week cost of care was (sic)255 (USD 349) in Remission, (sic)831 (USD 1138) in Response, (sic)891 (USD 1220) in Active, (sic)1360 (USD 1864) in Refractory, and (sic)16984 (USD 23269) in Surgery. HBI was the most important predictor of costs of care-a 1-point increase in HBI increased total costs by 25% (P &lt; 0.001). HRQoL differed between the disease states: 0.92 in Remission, 0.90 in Response, 0.82 in Active, 0.81 in Refractory, and 0.77 in Surgery. Conclusions: Patients in remission have the lowest costs and the highest HRQoL. Patients responding to treatment have lower costs of care than patients with high disease activity who are not treated or do not respond to treatment:. Thus, total costs of care might be reduced by efficient treatment.},
  author       = {Mesterton, Johan and Jonsson, Linus and Almer, Sven H. C. and Befrits, Ragnar and Friis-Liby, Ingalill and Lindgren, Stefan},
  issn         = {1536-4844},
  keyword      = {quality of life,Crohn's disease,costs,Harvey-Bradshaw index},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {12},
  pages        = {1882--1890},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Inflammatory Bowel Diseases},
  title        = {Resource Use and Societal Costs for Crohn's Disease in Sweden},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ibd.20939},
  volume       = {15},
  year         = {2009},
}