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An epidemic of furniture-related dermatitis: searching for a cause

Lammintausta, K.; Zimerson, Erik LU ; Hasan, T.; Susitaival, P.; Winhoven, S.; Gruvberger, Birgitta LU ; Beck, M.; Williams, J. D. and Bruze, Magnus LU (2010) In British Journal of Dermatology 162(1). p.108-116
Abstract
P>Background Sitting in new chairs or sofas has elicited dermatitis in numerous patients in Finland and in the U.K. since autumn 2006. The cause of the dermatitis seemed to be an allergen in the furniture materials. Objectives To determine the cause of the dermatitis in patients with furniture-related dermatitis. Methods Altogether 42 patients with furniture-related dermatitis were studied. First, 14 Finnish patients were patch tested with the standardized series and with the chair textile material. A thin-layer chromatogram (TLC) strip and an extract made from the same textile material were tested in seven Finnish patients. The test positive spot of the TLC and the content of a sachet found inside a sofa in the U.K. were analysed by... (More)
P>Background Sitting in new chairs or sofas has elicited dermatitis in numerous patients in Finland and in the U.K. since autumn 2006. The cause of the dermatitis seemed to be an allergen in the furniture materials. Objectives To determine the cause of the dermatitis in patients with furniture-related dermatitis. Methods Altogether 42 patients with furniture-related dermatitis were studied. First, 14 Finnish patients were patch tested with the standardized series and with the chair textile material. A thin-layer chromatogram (TLC) strip and an extract made from the same textile material were tested in seven Finnish patients. The test positive spot of the TLC and the content of a sachet found inside a sofa in the U.K. were analysed by using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. All chemicals analysed were patch tested in 37 patients. Results A positive patch test reaction to the chair textile and to its extract was seen in all patients tested, one-third of whom had concurrent reactions to acrylates. Positive reactions to the same spot of the TLC strip were seen in five of seven patients and dimethyl fumarate was analysed from the spot as well as from the sachet contents. Dimethyl fumarate (0 center dot 01%) elicited positive reactions in all the patients. The other chemicals analysed did not elicit positive reactions, but one patient in the U.K. had a positive reaction to tributyl phosphate. Conclusions Sensitization to dimethyl fumarate was seen in all the patients with furniture-related dermatitis. Concurrent sensitization or cross-reactions were common among the sensitized patients. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
dermatitis, sofa, dimethyl fumarates, chair dermatitis, contact sensitization
in
British Journal of Dermatology
volume
162
issue
1
pages
108 - 116
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000272882900016
  • scopus:72749084165
ISSN
1365-2133
DOI
10.1111/j.1365-2133.2009.09419.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
3d0aeb5d-dcc5-407a-a423-57857d659bca (old id 1535521)
date added to LUP
2010-01-27 13:26:43
date last changed
2018-05-29 09:40:21
@article{3d0aeb5d-dcc5-407a-a423-57857d659bca,
  abstract     = {P>Background Sitting in new chairs or sofas has elicited dermatitis in numerous patients in Finland and in the U.K. since autumn 2006. The cause of the dermatitis seemed to be an allergen in the furniture materials. Objectives To determine the cause of the dermatitis in patients with furniture-related dermatitis. Methods Altogether 42 patients with furniture-related dermatitis were studied. First, 14 Finnish patients were patch tested with the standardized series and with the chair textile material. A thin-layer chromatogram (TLC) strip and an extract made from the same textile material were tested in seven Finnish patients. The test positive spot of the TLC and the content of a sachet found inside a sofa in the U.K. were analysed by using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. All chemicals analysed were patch tested in 37 patients. Results A positive patch test reaction to the chair textile and to its extract was seen in all patients tested, one-third of whom had concurrent reactions to acrylates. Positive reactions to the same spot of the TLC strip were seen in five of seven patients and dimethyl fumarate was analysed from the spot as well as from the sachet contents. Dimethyl fumarate (0 center dot 01%) elicited positive reactions in all the patients. The other chemicals analysed did not elicit positive reactions, but one patient in the U.K. had a positive reaction to tributyl phosphate. Conclusions Sensitization to dimethyl fumarate was seen in all the patients with furniture-related dermatitis. Concurrent sensitization or cross-reactions were common among the sensitized patients.},
  author       = {Lammintausta, K. and Zimerson, Erik and Hasan, T. and Susitaival, P. and Winhoven, S. and Gruvberger, Birgitta and Beck, M. and Williams, J. D. and Bruze, Magnus},
  issn         = {1365-2133},
  keyword      = {dermatitis,sofa,dimethyl fumarates,chair dermatitis,contact sensitization},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {108--116},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {British Journal of Dermatology},
  title        = {An epidemic of furniture-related dermatitis: searching for a cause},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2133.2009.09419.x},
  volume       = {162},
  year         = {2010},
}