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Postural control and adaptation are influenced by preceding postural challenges.

Tjernström, Fredrik LU ; Fransson, Per-Anders LU ; Patel, Mitesh LU and Magnusson, Måns LU (2010) In Experimental Brain Research 202. p.613-621
Abstract
We investigated the possible consequences of two consecutive postural tasks on adaptation. Four groups (total number of 46 healthy subjects) were perturbed on two consecutive days with vibration stimulus to tibialis anterior or posterior calf muscles, or both in different orders. Postural movements were recorded with a force platform. There were three major results: (1) tibialis anterior vibration instigated postural adaptation during exposure to the vibration, but did not induce long-term adaptation from day to day, contrary to posterior calf vibration. (2) The long-term postural adaptation from day to day when the posterior calf was vibrated was not affected by prior or subsequent tibialis anterior vibration, which contrasts to other... (More)
We investigated the possible consequences of two consecutive postural tasks on adaptation. Four groups (total number of 46 healthy subjects) were perturbed on two consecutive days with vibration stimulus to tibialis anterior or posterior calf muscles, or both in different orders. Postural movements were recorded with a force platform. There were three major results: (1) tibialis anterior vibration instigated postural adaptation during exposure to the vibration, but did not induce long-term adaptation from day to day, contrary to posterior calf vibration. (2) The long-term postural adaptation from day to day when the posterior calf was vibrated was not affected by prior or subsequent tibialis anterior vibration, which contrasts to other studies on motor learning. (3) Exposure to posterior calf vibration prior tibialis anterior vibration, led to changes of postural strategies and larger amount of torque variance, implying that postural strategies initiated by the gastrocnemius vibration were re-employed during the subsequent tibialis anterior stimulation. This may represent the formation of an internal model, used as feed-forward control of posture, possibly consisting of sensory reweighting. Postural perturbations need to be sufficiently difficult to withstand, in order to induce long-term learning, and postural strategies may be transferred between different postural challenges if they post different demands. Clinically, this suggests that exercises designed to rehabilitate patients should be sufficiently challenging to instigate learning processes, and spaced in order to avoid development of inappropriate postural strategies. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Experimental Brain Research
volume
202
pages
613 - 621
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • wos:000276520600009
  • pmid:20101395
  • scopus:77951092414
ISSN
0014-4819
DOI
10.1007/s00221-010-2166-x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
309939f3-7f5e-4483-8293-6654bf0d0ec4 (old id 1540604)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20101395?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2010-02-03 10:48:48
date last changed
2018-06-17 04:57:57
@article{309939f3-7f5e-4483-8293-6654bf0d0ec4,
  abstract     = {We investigated the possible consequences of two consecutive postural tasks on adaptation. Four groups (total number of 46 healthy subjects) were perturbed on two consecutive days with vibration stimulus to tibialis anterior or posterior calf muscles, or both in different orders. Postural movements were recorded with a force platform. There were three major results: (1) tibialis anterior vibration instigated postural adaptation during exposure to the vibration, but did not induce long-term adaptation from day to day, contrary to posterior calf vibration. (2) The long-term postural adaptation from day to day when the posterior calf was vibrated was not affected by prior or subsequent tibialis anterior vibration, which contrasts to other studies on motor learning. (3) Exposure to posterior calf vibration prior tibialis anterior vibration, led to changes of postural strategies and larger amount of torque variance, implying that postural strategies initiated by the gastrocnemius vibration were re-employed during the subsequent tibialis anterior stimulation. This may represent the formation of an internal model, used as feed-forward control of posture, possibly consisting of sensory reweighting. Postural perturbations need to be sufficiently difficult to withstand, in order to induce long-term learning, and postural strategies may be transferred between different postural challenges if they post different demands. Clinically, this suggests that exercises designed to rehabilitate patients should be sufficiently challenging to instigate learning processes, and spaced in order to avoid development of inappropriate postural strategies.},
  author       = {Tjernström, Fredrik and Fransson, Per-Anders and Patel, Mitesh and Magnusson, Måns},
  issn         = {0014-4819},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {613--621},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Experimental Brain Research},
  title        = {Postural control and adaptation are influenced by preceding postural challenges.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-010-2166-x},
  volume       = {202},
  year         = {2010},
}