Advanced

Induced BVOCs: how to bug our models ?

Arneth, Almut LU and Niinemets, Ulo (2010) In Trends in Plant Science 15(3). p.118-125
Abstract
Climate-herbivory interactions have been largely debated vis-à-vis ecosystem carbon sequestration. However, invertebrate herbivores also modify emissions of plant biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs). Over the shorter term, they do this by the induction of de novo synthesis of a plethora of compounds; but invertebrates also affect the relative proportions of constitutively BVOCs-emitting plants. Thus, invertebrate-BVOCs interactions have potentially important implications for air quality and climate. Insect outbreaks are expected to increase with warmer climate, but quantitative understanding of BVOCs-invertebrate ecology, climate connections and atmospheric feedback remain as yet elusive. Examination of these interactions requires... (More)
Climate-herbivory interactions have been largely debated vis-à-vis ecosystem carbon sequestration. However, invertebrate herbivores also modify emissions of plant biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs). Over the shorter term, they do this by the induction of de novo synthesis of a plethora of compounds; but invertebrates also affect the relative proportions of constitutively BVOCs-emitting plants. Thus, invertebrate-BVOCs interactions have potentially important implications for air quality and climate. Insect outbreaks are expected to increase with warmer climate, but quantitative understanding of BVOCs-invertebrate ecology, climate connections and atmospheric feedback remain as yet elusive. Examination of these interactions requires a description of outbreaks in ecosystem models, combined with quantitative observations on leaf and ecosystem level. We review here recent advances and propose a strategy for inclusion of invertebrate-BVOCs relationships in terrestrial ecosystem models. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Trends in Plant Science
volume
15
issue
3
pages
118 - 125
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000276519800002
  • pmid:20071208
  • scopus:77649228051
ISSN
1360-1385
DOI
10.1016/j.tplants.2009.12.004
project
MERGE
BECC
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
6061370d-df3b-4076-8c6b-471081ab8158 (old id 1541104)
date added to LUP
2010-02-02 14:45:23
date last changed
2018-05-29 11:43:51
@article{6061370d-df3b-4076-8c6b-471081ab8158,
  abstract     = {Climate-herbivory interactions have been largely debated vis-à-vis ecosystem carbon sequestration. However, invertebrate herbivores also modify emissions of plant biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs). Over the shorter term, they do this by the induction of de novo synthesis of a plethora of compounds; but invertebrates also affect the relative proportions of constitutively BVOCs-emitting plants. Thus, invertebrate-BVOCs interactions have potentially important implications for air quality and climate. Insect outbreaks are expected to increase with warmer climate, but quantitative understanding of BVOCs-invertebrate ecology, climate connections and atmospheric feedback remain as yet elusive. Examination of these interactions requires a description of outbreaks in ecosystem models, combined with quantitative observations on leaf and ecosystem level. We review here recent advances and propose a strategy for inclusion of invertebrate-BVOCs relationships in terrestrial ecosystem models.},
  author       = {Arneth, Almut and Niinemets, Ulo},
  issn         = {1360-1385},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {118--125},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Trends in Plant Science},
  title        = {Induced BVOCs: how to bug our models ?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tplants.2009.12.004},
  volume       = {15},
  year         = {2010},
}