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Suspected arterial gas embolism after glossopharyngeal insufflation in a breath-hold diver.

Linér, Mats LU and Andersson, Johan P A (2010) In Aviation, Space and Environmental Medicine 81(1). p.74-76
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Many competitive breath-hold divers employ the technique of glossopharyngeal insufflation in order to increase their lung gas volume for a dive. After a maximal inspiration, using the oral and pharyngeal muscles repeatedly, air in the mouth is compressed and forced into the lungs. Such overexpansion of the lungs is associated with a high transpulmonary pressure, which could possibly cause pulmonary barotrauma. CASE REPORT: We report a case of transient neurological signs and symptoms occurring within 1 min after glossopharyngeal insufflation in a breath-hold diver. He complained of paresthesia of the right shoulder and a neurological exam revealed decreased sense of touch on the right side of the neck as compared to the left... (More)
INTRODUCTION: Many competitive breath-hold divers employ the technique of glossopharyngeal insufflation in order to increase their lung gas volume for a dive. After a maximal inspiration, using the oral and pharyngeal muscles repeatedly, air in the mouth is compressed and forced into the lungs. Such overexpansion of the lungs is associated with a high transpulmonary pressure, which could possibly cause pulmonary barotrauma. CASE REPORT: We report a case of transient neurological signs and symptoms occurring within 1 min after glossopharyngeal insufflation in a breath-hold diver. He complained of paresthesia of the right shoulder and a neurological exam revealed decreased sense of touch on the right side of the neck as compared to the left side. Motor function was normal. The course of events in this case is suggestive of arterial gas embolism. DISCUSSION: Although the diver recovered completely within a few minutes, the perspective of a more serious insult raises concerns in using the glossopharyngeal insufflation technique. In addition to a neurological insult, damage to other organs of the body has to be considered. Both acute and long-term negative health effects are conceivable. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Aviation, Space and Environmental Medicine
volume
81
issue
1
pages
74 - 76
publisher
Aerospace Medical Association
external identifiers
  • wos:000273270900013
  • pmid:20058741
  • scopus:74049123153
ISSN
1943-4448
DOI
10.3357/ASEM.2571.2010
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
1430f77e-e540-484a-9b08-ea9ddb52c037 (old id 1541332)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20058741?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2010-02-02 12:01:51
date last changed
2018-07-01 04:22:41
@article{1430f77e-e540-484a-9b08-ea9ddb52c037,
  abstract     = {INTRODUCTION: Many competitive breath-hold divers employ the technique of glossopharyngeal insufflation in order to increase their lung gas volume for a dive. After a maximal inspiration, using the oral and pharyngeal muscles repeatedly, air in the mouth is compressed and forced into the lungs. Such overexpansion of the lungs is associated with a high transpulmonary pressure, which could possibly cause pulmonary barotrauma. CASE REPORT: We report a case of transient neurological signs and symptoms occurring within 1 min after glossopharyngeal insufflation in a breath-hold diver. He complained of paresthesia of the right shoulder and a neurological exam revealed decreased sense of touch on the right side of the neck as compared to the left side. Motor function was normal. The course of events in this case is suggestive of arterial gas embolism. DISCUSSION: Although the diver recovered completely within a few minutes, the perspective of a more serious insult raises concerns in using the glossopharyngeal insufflation technique. In addition to a neurological insult, damage to other organs of the body has to be considered. Both acute and long-term negative health effects are conceivable.},
  author       = {Linér, Mats and Andersson, Johan P A},
  issn         = {1943-4448},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {74--76},
  publisher    = {Aerospace Medical Association},
  series       = {Aviation, Space and Environmental Medicine},
  title        = {Suspected arterial gas embolism after glossopharyngeal insufflation in a breath-hold diver.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3357/ASEM.2571.2010},
  volume       = {81},
  year         = {2010},
}