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Of maces and men. Symbols in a landscape of cultural diversity

Larsson, Lars LU (2004) In Journal of Nordic Archaeological Science 14. p.71-78
Abstract
Norms and conventions have applied to most of our material culture. This seems to be especially obvious regarding Neolithic flint axes. The distinction between the unpolished and the polished flint axe is one aspect of the symbolism that is inherent in or ascribed to the axes when they become maces, with an important position in social life. The individuals and the society become not only owners of axes but also holders of maces. Maces and man became interacting entities. Never, or very rarely, was an unpolished axe deposited in a grave, while it was fully accepted as part of a hoard. It is reasonable to work on the assumption that the Neolithic societies gave at least some parts of their material culture characteristics similar or... (More)
Norms and conventions have applied to most of our material culture. This seems to be especially obvious regarding Neolithic flint axes. The distinction between the unpolished and the polished flint axe is one aspect of the symbolism that is inherent in or ascribed to the axes when they become maces, with an important position in social life. The individuals and the society become not only owners of axes but also holders of maces. Maces and man became interacting entities. Never, or very rarely, was an unpolished axe deposited in a grave, while it was fully accepted as part of a hoard. It is reasonable to work on the assumption that the Neolithic societies gave at least some parts of their material culture characteristics similar or corresponding to the human members. Axes, like humans, were integrated into everyday life, being involved in ceremonies dependent on regularly recurring characteristics. Interaction between the human and the material cultural sphere, or at least some of the material culture, seems to be much closer or even more integrated than has usually been assumed. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
landscape, Southern Scandinavia, Neolithic, axes
in
Journal of Nordic Archaeological Science
volume
14
pages
71 - 78
publisher
Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet, Stockholms universitet
ISSN
1650-1519
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
9460a534-9a80-4b17-aa7c-af795d6fcfea (old id 154224)
date added to LUP
2007-07-25 13:39:22
date last changed
2016-04-16 05:31:01
@article{9460a534-9a80-4b17-aa7c-af795d6fcfea,
  abstract     = {Norms and conventions have applied to most of our material culture. This seems to be especially obvious regarding Neolithic flint axes. The distinction between the unpolished and the polished flint axe is one aspect of the symbolism that is inherent in or ascribed to the axes when they become maces, with an important position in social life. The individuals and the society become not only owners of axes but also holders of maces. Maces and man became interacting entities. Never, or very rarely, was an unpolished axe deposited in a grave, while it was fully accepted as part of a hoard. It is reasonable to work on the assumption that the Neolithic societies gave at least some parts of their material culture characteristics similar or corresponding to the human members. Axes, like humans, were integrated into everyday life, being involved in ceremonies dependent on regularly recurring characteristics. Interaction between the human and the material cultural sphere, or at least some of the material culture, seems to be much closer or even more integrated than has usually been assumed.},
  author       = {Larsson, Lars},
  issn         = {1650-1519},
  keyword      = {landscape,Southern Scandinavia,Neolithic,axes},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {71--78},
  publisher    = {Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet, Stockholms universitet},
  series       = {Journal of Nordic Archaeological Science},
  title        = {Of maces and men. Symbols in a landscape of cultural diversity},
  volume       = {14},
  year         = {2004},
}