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Mental Workload in Aircraft and Simulator During Basic Civil Aviation Training

Dahlström, Nicklas LU and Nahlinder, Staffan (2009) In International Journal of Aviation Psychology 19(4). p.309-325
Abstract
This study investigated mental workload in basic civil aviation training. Heart rate, eye movement, and subjective ratings from 11 students were collected during simulator and aircraft sessions. Results show high correspondence in psychophysiological reactions between the sessions. For some flight segments, heart rate was consistently lower in the simulator, suggesting higher mental workload in the aircraft. Differences in heart rate during rejected takeoff and engine failure indicate that the increase of workload starts in advance of an "unexpected" event in the simulator where it seems to be of preparatory nature, whereas in the aircraft it is more connected to management of the situation.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
International Journal of Aviation Psychology
volume
19
issue
4
pages
309 - 325
publisher
Taylor & Francis Inc.
external identifiers
  • wos:000273720100001
  • scopus:79953056973
ISSN
1050-8414
DOI
10.1080/10508410903187547
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
25b617b2-35b2-4758-a73f-4919013aaccf (old id 1546503)
date added to LUP
2010-02-25 15:39:19
date last changed
2017-08-27 04:45:41
@article{25b617b2-35b2-4758-a73f-4919013aaccf,
  abstract     = {This study investigated mental workload in basic civil aviation training. Heart rate, eye movement, and subjective ratings from 11 students were collected during simulator and aircraft sessions. Results show high correspondence in psychophysiological reactions between the sessions. For some flight segments, heart rate was consistently lower in the simulator, suggesting higher mental workload in the aircraft. Differences in heart rate during rejected takeoff and engine failure indicate that the increase of workload starts in advance of an "unexpected" event in the simulator where it seems to be of preparatory nature, whereas in the aircraft it is more connected to management of the situation.},
  author       = {Dahlström, Nicklas and Nahlinder, Staffan},
  issn         = {1050-8414},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {309--325},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis Inc.},
  series       = {International Journal of Aviation Psychology},
  title        = {Mental Workload in Aircraft and Simulator During Basic Civil Aviation Training},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10508410903187547},
  volume       = {19},
  year         = {2009},
}