Advanced

In vivo imaging of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in inflammation using the luminescent probe L-012

Kielland, Anders; Blom, Thomas LU ; Kutty Selva, Nandakumar LU ; Holmdahl, Rikard LU ; Blomhoff, Rune and Carlsen, Harald (2009) In Free Radical Biology & Medicine 47(6). p.760-766
Abstract
Production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) is an important part of the inflammatory response, but prolonged elevated levels of ROS/RNS as under chronic inflammation can contribute to the development of disease. Monitoring ROS/RNS in living animals is challenging due to the rapid turnover of ROS/RNS and the limited sensitivity and specificity of ROS/RNS probes. We have explored the use of the chemiluminescent probe L-012 for noninvasive imaging of ROS/RNS production during inflammation in living mice. Various inflammatory conditions were induced, and L-012-dependent luminescence was recorded with an ultrasensitive CCD camera. Strong luminescent signals were observed from different regions of the body corresponding to... (More)
Production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) is an important part of the inflammatory response, but prolonged elevated levels of ROS/RNS as under chronic inflammation can contribute to the development of disease. Monitoring ROS/RNS in living animals is challenging due to the rapid turnover of ROS/RNS and the limited sensitivity and specificity of ROS/RNS probes. We have explored the use of the chemiluminescent probe L-012 for noninvasive imaging of ROS/RNS production during inflammation in living mice. Various inflammatory conditions were induced, and L-012-dependent luminescence was recorded with an ultrasensitive CCD camera. Strong luminescent signals were observed from different regions of the body corresponding to inflammation. The signal was reduced by administration of the SOD mimetic tempol, the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin, and the inhibitor of nitric oxide synthesis L-NAME, signifying the requirement for the presence of ROS/RNS. Additionally, the L-012 signal was abolished in mice with a mutation in the Ncf1 gene, encoding a protein in the NADPH oxidase complex 2, which generates ROS/RNS during inflammation. In conclusion, L-012 is well distributed in the mouse body and mediates a strong ROS/RNS-dependent luminescent signal in vivo and is useful for monitoring the development and regulation of inflammation in living organisms. (C) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
RNS, Inflammation, L-012, In vivo, Molecular imaging, Optical imaging, Free radical, Mouse, Chemiluminescence, ROS, Luminescence
in
Free Radical Biology & Medicine
volume
47
issue
6
pages
760 - 766
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000273494300009
  • scopus:68549128495
ISSN
0891-5849
DOI
10.1016/j.freeradbiomed.2009.06.013
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
cb967db1-34a1-4714-a684-2f58213c0082 (old id 1546803)
date added to LUP
2010-02-25 12:50:17
date last changed
2017-12-17 03:23:55
@article{cb967db1-34a1-4714-a684-2f58213c0082,
  abstract     = {Production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) is an important part of the inflammatory response, but prolonged elevated levels of ROS/RNS as under chronic inflammation can contribute to the development of disease. Monitoring ROS/RNS in living animals is challenging due to the rapid turnover of ROS/RNS and the limited sensitivity and specificity of ROS/RNS probes. We have explored the use of the chemiluminescent probe L-012 for noninvasive imaging of ROS/RNS production during inflammation in living mice. Various inflammatory conditions were induced, and L-012-dependent luminescence was recorded with an ultrasensitive CCD camera. Strong luminescent signals were observed from different regions of the body corresponding to inflammation. The signal was reduced by administration of the SOD mimetic tempol, the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin, and the inhibitor of nitric oxide synthesis L-NAME, signifying the requirement for the presence of ROS/RNS. Additionally, the L-012 signal was abolished in mice with a mutation in the Ncf1 gene, encoding a protein in the NADPH oxidase complex 2, which generates ROS/RNS during inflammation. In conclusion, L-012 is well distributed in the mouse body and mediates a strong ROS/RNS-dependent luminescent signal in vivo and is useful for monitoring the development and regulation of inflammation in living organisms. (C) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Kielland, Anders and Blom, Thomas and Kutty Selva, Nandakumar and Holmdahl, Rikard and Blomhoff, Rune and Carlsen, Harald},
  issn         = {0891-5849},
  keyword      = {RNS,Inflammation,L-012,In vivo,Molecular imaging,Optical imaging,Free radical,Mouse,Chemiluminescence,ROS,Luminescence},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {760--766},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Free Radical Biology & Medicine},
  title        = {In vivo imaging of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in inflammation using the luminescent probe L-012},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.freeradbiomed.2009.06.013},
  volume       = {47},
  year         = {2009},
}