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Survival and Years of Life Lost in Different Age Cohorts of Patients With Multiple Myeloma.

Ludwig, Heinz; Bolejack, Vanessa; Crowley, John; Bladé, Joan; San Miguel, Jesus; Kyle, Robert A; Rajkumar, S Vincent; Shimizu, Kazuyuki; Turesson, Ingemar LU and Westin, Jan, et al. (2010) In Journal of Clinical Oncology 28. p.1599-1605
Abstract
PURPOSE: To assess the impact of age on outcome and to analyze the projected years of life lost in patients with multiple myeloma. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Ten thousand five hundred forty-nine patients were evaluated; 6,996 patients were treated with conventional chemotherapy, and 3,553 patients were treated with high-dose therapy with autologous stem-cell transplantation. RESULTS: Mean observed and relative overall survival times in the entire cohort were 3.7 and 3.9 years, respectively. Observed survival decreased steadily from 6.4 years in patients younger than age 50 years to 2.5 years in patients >/= age 80 years. A similar decrease was noted for relative survival. Higher age correlated significantly with higher International Staging... (More)
PURPOSE: To assess the impact of age on outcome and to analyze the projected years of life lost in patients with multiple myeloma. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Ten thousand five hundred forty-nine patients were evaluated; 6,996 patients were treated with conventional chemotherapy, and 3,553 patients were treated with high-dose therapy with autologous stem-cell transplantation. RESULTS: Mean observed and relative overall survival times in the entire cohort were 3.7 and 3.9 years, respectively. Observed survival decreased steadily from 6.4 years in patients younger than age 50 years to 2.5 years in patients >/= age 80 years. A similar decrease was noted for relative survival. Higher age correlated significantly with higher International Staging System (ISS) stage. Relative excess risk of death differed significantly between 10-year age cohorts beginning from age 40 years (P < .001 for age 50 to 59 v age 40 to 49, P < .001 for age 60 to 69 v age 50 to 59, P < .001 for age 70 to 79 v age 60 to 69, and P = .009 for age >/= 80 v 70 to 79). The average years of life lost per patient was 16.8 years in the entire patient cohort and decreased steadily from 36.1 years in patients younger than 40 years old to 4.6 years in patients >/= age 80 years. CONCLUSION: Age is associated with higher ISS stage and is an important risk factor for early mortality. Survival declined continuously by each decade from age 50 to age >/= 80 from more than 6 to less than 3 years. The average of years of life lost in patients with myeloma is higher than in many other cancers and amounts to more than 30 years in patients younger than 40 years old but decreases to less than 5 years in patients age 80 years or older. (Less)
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Journal of Clinical Oncology
volume
28
pages
1599 - 1605
publisher
American Society of Clinical Oncology
external identifiers
  • wos:000275824600025
  • pmid:20177027
  • scopus:77951923656
ISSN
1527-7755
DOI
10.1200/JCO.2009.25.2114
language
English
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yes
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8a0192e4-d698-4d5b-95e5-42cb359ce30b (old id 1552326)
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20177027?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2010-03-03 13:27:52
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2018-06-10 04:47:43
@article{8a0192e4-d698-4d5b-95e5-42cb359ce30b,
  abstract     = {PURPOSE: To assess the impact of age on outcome and to analyze the projected years of life lost in patients with multiple myeloma. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Ten thousand five hundred forty-nine patients were evaluated; 6,996 patients were treated with conventional chemotherapy, and 3,553 patients were treated with high-dose therapy with autologous stem-cell transplantation. RESULTS: Mean observed and relative overall survival times in the entire cohort were 3.7 and 3.9 years, respectively. Observed survival decreased steadily from 6.4 years in patients younger than age 50 years to 2.5 years in patients &gt;/= age 80 years. A similar decrease was noted for relative survival. Higher age correlated significantly with higher International Staging System (ISS) stage. Relative excess risk of death differed significantly between 10-year age cohorts beginning from age 40 years (P &lt; .001 for age 50 to 59 v age 40 to 49, P &lt; .001 for age 60 to 69 v age 50 to 59, P &lt; .001 for age 70 to 79 v age 60 to 69, and P = .009 for age &gt;/= 80 v 70 to 79). The average years of life lost per patient was 16.8 years in the entire patient cohort and decreased steadily from 36.1 years in patients younger than 40 years old to 4.6 years in patients &gt;/= age 80 years. CONCLUSION: Age is associated with higher ISS stage and is an important risk factor for early mortality. Survival declined continuously by each decade from age 50 to age &gt;/= 80 from more than 6 to less than 3 years. The average of years of life lost in patients with myeloma is higher than in many other cancers and amounts to more than 30 years in patients younger than 40 years old but decreases to less than 5 years in patients age 80 years or older.},
  author       = {Ludwig, Heinz and Bolejack, Vanessa and Crowley, John and Bladé, Joan and San Miguel, Jesus and Kyle, Robert A and Rajkumar, S Vincent and Shimizu, Kazuyuki and Turesson, Ingemar and Westin, Jan and Sonneveld, Pieter and Cavo, Michele and Boccadoro, Mario and Palumbo, Antonio and Tosi, Patrizia and Harousseau, Jean-Luc and Attal, Michel and Barlogie, Bart and Stewart, A Keith and Durie, Brian},
  issn         = {1527-7755},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {1599--1605},
  publisher    = {American Society of Clinical Oncology},
  series       = {Journal of Clinical Oncology},
  title        = {Survival and Years of Life Lost in Different Age Cohorts of Patients With Multiple Myeloma.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1200/JCO.2009.25.2114},
  volume       = {28},
  year         = {2010},
}