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Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty in patients aged less than 65. Combined data from the Australian and Swedish Knee Registries

W-Dahl, Annette LU ; Robertsson, Otto LU ; Lidgren, Lars LU ; Miller, Lisa; Davidson, David and Graves, Stephen (2010) In Acta Orthopaedica 81(1). p.90-94
Abstract
Introduction and purpose In recent years, there has been renewed interest in using unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA). Several studies have reported increasing numbers of UKAs for osteoarthritis in patients who are less than 65 years of age, with low revision rates. To describe and compare the use and outcome of UKA in this age group, we have combined data from the Australian and Swedish knee registries. Patients and methods More than 34,000 UKA procedures carried out between 1998 and 2007 were analyzed, and we focused on over 16,000 patients younger than 65 years to determine usage and to determine differences in the revision rate. Survival analysis was used to determine outcomes of revision related to age and sex, using any reason... (More)
Introduction and purpose In recent years, there has been renewed interest in using unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA). Several studies have reported increasing numbers of UKAs for osteoarthritis in patients who are less than 65 years of age, with low revision rates. To describe and compare the use and outcome of UKA in this age group, we have combined data from the Australian and Swedish knee registries. Patients and methods More than 34,000 UKA procedures carried out between 1998 and 2007 were analyzed, and we focused on over 16,000 patients younger than 65 years to determine usage and to determine differences in the revision rate. Survival analysis was used to determine outcomes of revision related to age and sex, using any reason for revision as the endpoint. Results Both countries showed a decreasing use of UKA in recent years in terms of the proportion of knee replacements and absolute numbers undertaken per year. The 7-year cumulative risk of revision of UKA in patients younger than 65 years was similar in the two countries. Patients younger than 55 years had a statistically significantly higher cumulative risk of revision than patients aged 55 to 64 years (19% and 12%, respectively at 7 years). The risk of revision in patients less than 65 years of age was similar in both sexes. Interpretation The results of the combined UKA data from the Australian and Swedish registries show a uniformity of outcome between countries with patients aged less than 65 having a higher rate of revision than patients who were 65 or older. Surgeons and patients should be aware of the higher risk of revision in this age group. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Acta Orthopaedica
volume
81
issue
1
pages
90 - 94
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000276167300017
  • pmid:20175656
  • scopus:77950473777
ISSN
1745-3682
DOI
10.3109/17453671003587150
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
61249489-71b3-4a36-b325-64b32472d8b9 (old id 1552377)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20175656?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2010-03-03 13:03:15
date last changed
2018-06-17 04:05:56
@article{61249489-71b3-4a36-b325-64b32472d8b9,
  abstract     = {Introduction and purpose In recent years, there has been renewed interest in using unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA). Several studies have reported increasing numbers of UKAs for osteoarthritis in patients who are less than 65 years of age, with low revision rates. To describe and compare the use and outcome of UKA in this age group, we have combined data from the Australian and Swedish knee registries. Patients and methods More than 34,000 UKA procedures carried out between 1998 and 2007 were analyzed, and we focused on over 16,000 patients younger than 65 years to determine usage and to determine differences in the revision rate. Survival analysis was used to determine outcomes of revision related to age and sex, using any reason for revision as the endpoint. Results Both countries showed a decreasing use of UKA in recent years in terms of the proportion of knee replacements and absolute numbers undertaken per year. The 7-year cumulative risk of revision of UKA in patients younger than 65 years was similar in the two countries. Patients younger than 55 years had a statistically significantly higher cumulative risk of revision than patients aged 55 to 64 years (19% and 12%, respectively at 7 years). The risk of revision in patients less than 65 years of age was similar in both sexes. Interpretation The results of the combined UKA data from the Australian and Swedish registries show a uniformity of outcome between countries with patients aged less than 65 having a higher rate of revision than patients who were 65 or older. Surgeons and patients should be aware of the higher risk of revision in this age group.},
  author       = {W-Dahl, Annette and Robertsson, Otto and Lidgren, Lars and Miller, Lisa and Davidson, David and Graves, Stephen},
  issn         = {1745-3682},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {90--94},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Acta Orthopaedica},
  title        = {Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty in patients aged less than 65. Combined data from the Australian and Swedish Knee Registries},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/17453671003587150},
  volume       = {81},
  year         = {2010},
}