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Death and irreversibility.

Egonsson, Dan LU (2009) 5th International Symposium of the Definition of Death Network In Reviews in the Neurosciences 20(3-4). p.275-281
Abstract
The concept of irreversibility plays a central role in most discussions of how to understand and determine human death. This seems to relativize death, since the possibilities of reversal will always depend on circumstance. I discuss the conceptual problems created by this fact, arguing that their seriousness depends on whether we take our conception of death to be a definition or criterion. Relativity is probably not fatal in a definition of death; it might even be desirable in a policy criterion. The concept of permanence is no less philosophically problematic in this context than irreversibility.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
permanence, relativity, irreversibility, criteria, death, definitions
in
Reviews in the Neurosciences
volume
20
issue
3-4
pages
275 - 281
publisher
Freund Publishing House Ltd
conference name
5th International Symposium of the Definition of Death Network
conference location
Varadero Beach, Cuba
conference dates
2008-05-20 - 2008-05-23
external identifiers
  • pmid:20157997
  • scopus:75649106793
  • wos:000273232900013
ISSN
0334-1763
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b229852b-475d-4e5c-ab52-e337c4df2c9a (old id 1552633)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20157997?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 13:48:56
date last changed
2021-05-05 03:42:14
@article{b229852b-475d-4e5c-ab52-e337c4df2c9a,
  abstract     = {The concept of irreversibility plays a central role in most discussions of how to understand and determine human death. This seems to relativize death, since the possibilities of reversal will always depend on circumstance. I discuss the conceptual problems created by this fact, arguing that their seriousness depends on whether we take our conception of death to be a definition or criterion. Relativity is probably not fatal in a definition of death; it might even be desirable in a policy criterion. The concept of permanence is no less philosophically problematic in this context than irreversibility.},
  author       = {Egonsson, Dan},
  issn         = {0334-1763},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3-4},
  pages        = {275--281},
  publisher    = {Freund Publishing House Ltd},
  series       = {Reviews in the Neurosciences},
  title        = {Death and irreversibility.},
  url          = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20157997?dopt=Abstract},
  volume       = {20},
  year         = {2009},
}