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Conflict between the work and family domains and exhaustion among vocationally active men and women.

Canivet, Catarina LU ; Östergren, Per-Olof LU ; Lindeberg, Sara LU ; Choi, Bongkyoo; Karasek, Robert; Moghaddassi, Mahnaz LU and Isacsson, Sven-Olof LU (2010) In Social Science and Medicine 70. p.1237-1245
Abstract
Exhaustion is consistently found to be more prevalent in women than in men. Women suffer from job strain more often, which may constitute a partial explanation for this phenomenon, but experienced shortcomings in combining work and family demands may also contribute to ill health. The aim of this study was to investigate, and analyse by gender, how work-related and family-related factors, as well as the interface between them, i.e. work-to-family conflict (WFC) and family-to-work conflict (FWC), are related to exhaustion. The study was cross-sectional with self-administered questionnaires assessing exposures and outcome with previously well-validated instruments. The participants were 2726 men and 2735 women, aged 45-64, vocationally... (More)
Exhaustion is consistently found to be more prevalent in women than in men. Women suffer from job strain more often, which may constitute a partial explanation for this phenomenon, but experienced shortcomings in combining work and family demands may also contribute to ill health. The aim of this study was to investigate, and analyse by gender, how work-related and family-related factors, as well as the interface between them, i.e. work-to-family conflict (WFC) and family-to-work conflict (FWC), are related to exhaustion. The study was cross-sectional with self-administered questionnaires assessing exposures and outcome with previously well-validated instruments. The participants were 2726 men and 2735 women, aged 45-64, vocationally active, and residing in Malmö, Sweden. Sixteen percent of the women and 8% of the men considered themselves exhausted. WFC, FWC, job strain, and low job support were all strongly correlated to exhaustion in both genders. In the multivariate analyses, adjusting for other work and family risk factors, WFC and FWC remained statistically significant risk factors for exhaustion in both men and women. Job strain, low job support, and having a somatic disorder were also independently associated with exhaustion. While WFC was more prevalent among men, it was more strongly associated with exhaustion in women than in men. In women, WFC and FWC contributed to a larger part of the explanatory power of the model, which amounted to 22% of the variance in women and 14% in men. The results imply that the concept of 'work stress' should be regarded in a wider context in order to understand gender related issues of exhaustion among vocationally active individuals. (Less)
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author
organization
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Social Science and Medicine
volume
70
pages
1237 - 1245
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000276706400019
  • pmid:20137848
  • scopus:77950056567
ISSN
1873-5347
DOI
10.1016/j.socscimed.2009.12.029
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
e4eb5200-d594-459c-afbe-31549dec7d88 (old id 1552869)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20137848?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2010-03-02 21:17:24
date last changed
2018-05-29 11:57:02
@article{e4eb5200-d594-459c-afbe-31549dec7d88,
  abstract     = {Exhaustion is consistently found to be more prevalent in women than in men. Women suffer from job strain more often, which may constitute a partial explanation for this phenomenon, but experienced shortcomings in combining work and family demands may also contribute to ill health. The aim of this study was to investigate, and analyse by gender, how work-related and family-related factors, as well as the interface between them, i.e. work-to-family conflict (WFC) and family-to-work conflict (FWC), are related to exhaustion. The study was cross-sectional with self-administered questionnaires assessing exposures and outcome with previously well-validated instruments. The participants were 2726 men and 2735 women, aged 45-64, vocationally active, and residing in Malmö, Sweden. Sixteen percent of the women and 8% of the men considered themselves exhausted. WFC, FWC, job strain, and low job support were all strongly correlated to exhaustion in both genders. In the multivariate analyses, adjusting for other work and family risk factors, WFC and FWC remained statistically significant risk factors for exhaustion in both men and women. Job strain, low job support, and having a somatic disorder were also independently associated with exhaustion. While WFC was more prevalent among men, it was more strongly associated with exhaustion in women than in men. In women, WFC and FWC contributed to a larger part of the explanatory power of the model, which amounted to 22% of the variance in women and 14% in men. The results imply that the concept of 'work stress' should be regarded in a wider context in order to understand gender related issues of exhaustion among vocationally active individuals.},
  author       = {Canivet, Catarina and Östergren, Per-Olof and Lindeberg, Sara and Choi, Bongkyoo and Karasek, Robert and Moghaddassi, Mahnaz and Isacsson, Sven-Olof},
  issn         = {1873-5347},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {1237--1245},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Social Science and Medicine},
  title        = {Conflict between the work and family domains and exhaustion among vocationally active men and women.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2009.12.029},
  volume       = {70},
  year         = {2010},
}