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Beyond Space. Border Making in European Integration, the case of Ireland

Hellström, Anders LU (2003) In Geografiska Annaler. Series B. Human Geography 85(3). p.123-135
Abstract
The current ambition to enlarge the European Union (EU) from fifteen to twenty-seven member states has brought to the fore questions about European integration and its overarching aim. On 7 June, 2001, the Irish people decided not to ratify the Nice Treaty. However, the Irish 'no' was not considered to be an expression of political resentment that could impinge on further development of European integration, but rather a sign of an information deficit. According to the EU top down rhetoric, the Irish people had not yet realised what it means to be, act and think as Europeans in Europe. The Irish referendum serves in this respect as a crucial juncture which brings to the surface otherwise veiled discursive power mechanisms that frame... (More)
The current ambition to enlarge the European Union (EU) from fifteen to twenty-seven member states has brought to the fore questions about European integration and its overarching aim. On 7 June, 2001, the Irish people decided not to ratify the Nice Treaty. However, the Irish 'no' was not considered to be an expression of political resentment that could impinge on further development of European integration, but rather a sign of an information deficit. According to the EU top down rhetoric, the Irish people had not yet realised what it means to be, act and think as Europeans in Europe. The Irish referendum serves in this respect as a crucial juncture which brings to the surface otherwise veiled discursive power mechanisms that frame sociopolitical action within the EU discourse. This article analyses EU transcripts and speeches, as well as Irish newspaper articles prior to and after the referendum in order to depict these many-faceted mechanisms surrounding the border-making processes in European integration.



It is argued that the Irish referendum, rather than altering the process of European integration in any significant way, has served the endeavours to fix a consolidated European Space. In other words, the European space that we live in is conceived of as if it could be presupposed beyond space. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Politisk makt och demokrati, Politisk kommunikation, Politik i Europa, Politisk teori och metod
in
Geografiska Annaler. Series B. Human Geography
volume
85
issue
3
pages
123 - 135
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • scopus:28444459916
ISSN
1468-0467
DOI
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
62b73ecc-8b8f-4fc7-999d-b8e15b9bdac0 (old id 156349)
date added to LUP
2007-06-25 10:00:40
date last changed
2018-05-29 10:18:07
@article{62b73ecc-8b8f-4fc7-999d-b8e15b9bdac0,
  abstract     = {The current ambition to enlarge the European Union (EU) from fifteen to twenty-seven member states has brought to the fore questions about European integration and its overarching aim. On 7 June, 2001, the Irish people decided not to ratify the Nice Treaty. However, the Irish 'no' was not considered to be an expression of political resentment that could impinge on further development of European integration, but rather a sign of an information deficit. According to the EU top down rhetoric, the Irish people had not yet realised what it means to be, act and think as Europeans in Europe. The Irish referendum serves in this respect as a crucial juncture which brings to the surface otherwise veiled discursive power mechanisms that frame sociopolitical action within the EU discourse. This article analyses EU transcripts and speeches, as well as Irish newspaper articles prior to and after the referendum in order to depict these many-faceted mechanisms surrounding the border-making processes in European integration.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
It is argued that the Irish referendum, rather than altering the process of European integration in any significant way, has served the endeavours to fix a consolidated European Space. In other words, the European space that we live in is conceived of as if it could be presupposed beyond space.},
  author       = {Hellström, Anders},
  issn         = {1468-0467},
  keyword      = {Politisk makt och demokrati,Politisk kommunikation,Politik i Europa,Politisk teori och metod},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {123--135},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Geografiska Annaler. Series B. Human Geography},
  title        = {Beyond Space. Border Making in European Integration, the case of Ireland},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/},
  volume       = {85},
  year         = {2003},
}