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Enzyme adsorption on SO2 catalyzed steam-pretreated wheat and spruce material

Piccolo, Chiara; Wiman, Magnus LU ; Bezzo, Fabrizio and Lidén, Gunnar LU (2010) In Enzyme and Microbial Technology 46(3-4). p.159-169
Abstract
Lignocellulose is widely recognized as a Sustainable substrate for biofuels production, and the enzymatic hydrolysis is regarded as a critical step for the development of ail effective process for the conversion of cellulose into ethanol. One key factor affecting the overall conversion rate is the adsorption capacity of the cellulase enzymes to the surface of the insoluble substrate. Pretreatment has a strong impact on hydrolysis, which could be related to both chemical changes and morphological changes of the material. In the current work, the accessibility of four differently pretreated wheat straw substrates, two differently pretreated spruce materials, and Avicel cellulose was investigated. Adsorption isotherms (at 4 degrees C and 30... (More)
Lignocellulose is widely recognized as a Sustainable substrate for biofuels production, and the enzymatic hydrolysis is regarded as a critical step for the development of ail effective process for the conversion of cellulose into ethanol. One key factor affecting the overall conversion rate is the adsorption capacity of the cellulase enzymes to the surface of the insoluble substrate. Pretreatment has a strong impact on hydrolysis, which could be related to both chemical changes and morphological changes of the material. In the current work, the accessibility of four differently pretreated wheat straw substrates, two differently pretreated spruce materials, and Avicel cellulose was investigated. Adsorption isotherms (at 4 degrees C and 30 degrees C) for a cellulase preparation were obtained, and the rates of hydrolysis were determined for the different materials. Furthermore, the surface area and pore size distribution of the various materials were measured and compared to adsorption and hydrolysis properties, and the structures of the pretreated materials were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results demonstrated a positive correlation between enzyme adsorption and the substrate specific surface area within each feedstock. Overall, the amount of enzyme adsorbed was higher for pretreated spruce than for the pretreated wheat straw, but this was not accompanied by a higher initial rate of hydrolysis for spruce. Also, the difference in the measured endoglucanase adsorption and overall FPU adsorption suggests that a larger fraction of the enzyme adsorbed on spruce was unproductive binding. The SEM analysis of the material illustrated the structural effects of pretreatment harshness on the materials, and suggested that increased porosity explains the higher rate of hydrolysis of more severely pretreated biomass. (C) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Bioethanol, Spruce, Wheat straw, Lignocellulose hydrolysis, Pretreatment, Specific area, Enzyme adsorption
in
Enzyme and Microbial Technology
volume
46
issue
3-4
pages
159 - 169
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000274773500002
  • scopus:74149089625
ISSN
0141-0229
DOI
10.1016/j.enzmictec.2009.11.007
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
3b4bd093-2712-4dca-a7df-899da67e95df (old id 1568606)
date added to LUP
2010-03-17 15:03:32
date last changed
2018-05-29 11:45:21
@article{3b4bd093-2712-4dca-a7df-899da67e95df,
  abstract     = {Lignocellulose is widely recognized as a Sustainable substrate for biofuels production, and the enzymatic hydrolysis is regarded as a critical step for the development of ail effective process for the conversion of cellulose into ethanol. One key factor affecting the overall conversion rate is the adsorption capacity of the cellulase enzymes to the surface of the insoluble substrate. Pretreatment has a strong impact on hydrolysis, which could be related to both chemical changes and morphological changes of the material. In the current work, the accessibility of four differently pretreated wheat straw substrates, two differently pretreated spruce materials, and Avicel cellulose was investigated. Adsorption isotherms (at 4 degrees C and 30 degrees C) for a cellulase preparation were obtained, and the rates of hydrolysis were determined for the different materials. Furthermore, the surface area and pore size distribution of the various materials were measured and compared to adsorption and hydrolysis properties, and the structures of the pretreated materials were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results demonstrated a positive correlation between enzyme adsorption and the substrate specific surface area within each feedstock. Overall, the amount of enzyme adsorbed was higher for pretreated spruce than for the pretreated wheat straw, but this was not accompanied by a higher initial rate of hydrolysis for spruce. Also, the difference in the measured endoglucanase adsorption and overall FPU adsorption suggests that a larger fraction of the enzyme adsorbed on spruce was unproductive binding. The SEM analysis of the material illustrated the structural effects of pretreatment harshness on the materials, and suggested that increased porosity explains the higher rate of hydrolysis of more severely pretreated biomass. (C) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Piccolo, Chiara and Wiman, Magnus and Bezzo, Fabrizio and Lidén, Gunnar},
  issn         = {0141-0229},
  keyword      = {Bioethanol,Spruce,Wheat straw,Lignocellulose hydrolysis,Pretreatment,Specific area,Enzyme adsorption},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3-4},
  pages        = {159--169},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Enzyme and Microbial Technology},
  title        = {Enzyme adsorption on SO2 catalyzed steam-pretreated wheat and spruce material},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.enzmictec.2009.11.007},
  volume       = {46},
  year         = {2010},
}