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ETFAD/EADV eczema task force 2009 position paper on diagnosis and treatment of atopic dermatitis

Darsow, U.; Wollenberg, A.; Simon, D.; Taieb, A.; Werfel, T.; Oranje, A.; Gelmetti, C.; Svensson, Åke LU ; Deleuran, M. and Calza, A-M, et al. (2010) In Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology 24(3). p.317-328
Abstract
Background The diagnosis of atopic dermatitis (AD) is made using evaluated clinical criteria. Management of AD must consider the symptomatic variability of the disease. Methods EADV eczema task force developed its guideline for atopic dermatitis diagnosis and treatment based on literature review and repeated consenting group discussions. Results and Discussion Basic therapy relies on hydrating topical treatment and avoidance of specific and unspecific provocation factors. Anti-inflammatory treatment based on topical glucocorticosteroids and topical calcineurin antagonists is used for exacerbation management and more recently for proactive therapy in selected cases. Topical corticosteroids remain the mainstay of therapy, but the topical... (More)
Background The diagnosis of atopic dermatitis (AD) is made using evaluated clinical criteria. Management of AD must consider the symptomatic variability of the disease. Methods EADV eczema task force developed its guideline for atopic dermatitis diagnosis and treatment based on literature review and repeated consenting group discussions. Results and Discussion Basic therapy relies on hydrating topical treatment and avoidance of specific and unspecific provocation factors. Anti-inflammatory treatment based on topical glucocorticosteroids and topical calcineurin antagonists is used for exacerbation management and more recently for proactive therapy in selected cases. Topical corticosteroids remain the mainstay of therapy, but the topical calcineurin inhibitors, tacrolimus and pimecrolimus are preferred in certain locations. Systemic anti-inflammatory treatment is an option for severe refractory cases. Microbial colonization and superinfection may induce disease exacerbation and can justify additional antimicrobial/antiseptic treatment. Systemic antihistamines (H1) can relieve pruritus, but do not have sufficient effect on eczema. Adjuvant therapy includes UV irradiation preferably of UVA1 wavelength or UVB 311 nm. Dietary recommendations should be specific and given only in diagnosed individual food allergy. Allergen-specific immunotherapy to aeroallergens may be useful in selected cases. Stress-induced exacerbations may make psychosomatic counselling recommendable. 'Eczema school' educational programmes have been proven to be helpful. (Less)
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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
therapy, guideline, atopic dermatitis, eczema
in
Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology
volume
24
issue
3
pages
317 - 328
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000274389300011
  • scopus:76349105505
ISSN
1468-3083
DOI
10.1111/j.1468-3083.2009.03415.x
language
English
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yes
id
375fb9dd-3e1c-4c04-b8e5-6c851f4fc63a (old id 1570064)
date added to LUP
2010-03-17 09:14:54
date last changed
2018-07-01 03:19:08
@article{375fb9dd-3e1c-4c04-b8e5-6c851f4fc63a,
  abstract     = {Background The diagnosis of atopic dermatitis (AD) is made using evaluated clinical criteria. Management of AD must consider the symptomatic variability of the disease. Methods EADV eczema task force developed its guideline for atopic dermatitis diagnosis and treatment based on literature review and repeated consenting group discussions. Results and Discussion Basic therapy relies on hydrating topical treatment and avoidance of specific and unspecific provocation factors. Anti-inflammatory treatment based on topical glucocorticosteroids and topical calcineurin antagonists is used for exacerbation management and more recently for proactive therapy in selected cases. Topical corticosteroids remain the mainstay of therapy, but the topical calcineurin inhibitors, tacrolimus and pimecrolimus are preferred in certain locations. Systemic anti-inflammatory treatment is an option for severe refractory cases. Microbial colonization and superinfection may induce disease exacerbation and can justify additional antimicrobial/antiseptic treatment. Systemic antihistamines (H1) can relieve pruritus, but do not have sufficient effect on eczema. Adjuvant therapy includes UV irradiation preferably of UVA1 wavelength or UVB 311 nm. Dietary recommendations should be specific and given only in diagnosed individual food allergy. Allergen-specific immunotherapy to aeroallergens may be useful in selected cases. Stress-induced exacerbations may make psychosomatic counselling recommendable. 'Eczema school' educational programmes have been proven to be helpful.},
  author       = {Darsow, U. and Wollenberg, A. and Simon, D. and Taieb, A. and Werfel, T. and Oranje, A. and Gelmetti, C. and Svensson, Åke and Deleuran, M. and Calza, A-M and Giusti, F. and Luebbe, J. and Seidenari, S. and Ring, J.},
  issn         = {1468-3083},
  keyword      = {therapy,guideline,atopic dermatitis,eczema},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {317--328},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology},
  title        = {ETFAD/EADV eczema task force 2009 position paper on diagnosis and treatment of atopic dermatitis},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-3083.2009.03415.x},
  volume       = {24},
  year         = {2010},
}