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Randomized clinical trial comparing open with video-assisted minimally invasive parathyroid surgery for primary hyperparathyroidism

Hessman, O.; Westerdahl, Johan LU ; Al-Suliman, N.; Christiansen, P.; Hellman, P. and Bergenfelz, Anders LU (2010) In British Journal of Surgery 97(2). p.177-184
Abstract
Background: Previous studies of video-assisted techniques for parathyroidectomy in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism have found similar or better results compared with bilateral neck exploration. The aim of the present study was to compare open minimally invasive parathyroidectomy with the video-assisted technique for primary hyperparathyroidism in a multicentre randomized trial. Methods: Some 143 patients were randomized to open (n = 75) or video-assisted (11 = 68) parathyroidectomy after positive sestamibi scintigraphy. There were no differences in preoperative data. The open operation was performed through a 15-mm incision. The video-assisted techniques used were minimally invasive video-assisted parathyroidectomy (MIVAP) or... (More)
Background: Previous studies of video-assisted techniques for parathyroidectomy in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism have found similar or better results compared with bilateral neck exploration. The aim of the present study was to compare open minimally invasive parathyroidectomy with the video-assisted technique for primary hyperparathyroidism in a multicentre randomized trial. Methods: Some 143 patients were randomized to open (n = 75) or video-assisted (11 = 68) parathyroidectomy after positive sestamibi scintigraphy. There were no differences in preoperative data. The open operation was performed through a 15-mm incision. The video-assisted techniques used were minimally invasive video-assisted parathyroidectomy (MIVAP) or video-assisted parathyroidectomy using the lateral approach (VAPLA). Data were collected prospectively including postoperative pain scoring. Results: The procedure was significantly quicker for the open compared to the video assisted operations: mean(s.d.) 60(35) versus 84(47) min (P = 0.001). Both groups of patients had similar conversion rates and the same outcome, with comparable incision lengths, low scores for postoperative neck discomfort, high cosmetic satisfaction and low complication rates. Conclusion: Open minimally invasive parathyroidectomy for primary hyperparathyroidism was quicker than either video-assisted technique. Registration number: NCT00877981 (http://www.clinicaltrials.gov) (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
British Journal of Surgery
volume
97
issue
2
pages
177 - 184
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • wos:000274098100006
  • scopus:74549131574
ISSN
1365-2168
DOI
10.1002/bjs.6810
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
808c3b6c-0e1a-4f26-a861-a18aba84659e (old id 1571150)
date added to LUP
2010-03-16 14:32:01
date last changed
2018-05-29 12:30:27
@article{808c3b6c-0e1a-4f26-a861-a18aba84659e,
  abstract     = {Background: Previous studies of video-assisted techniques for parathyroidectomy in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism have found similar or better results compared with bilateral neck exploration. The aim of the present study was to compare open minimally invasive parathyroidectomy with the video-assisted technique for primary hyperparathyroidism in a multicentre randomized trial. Methods: Some 143 patients were randomized to open (n = 75) or video-assisted (11 = 68) parathyroidectomy after positive sestamibi scintigraphy. There were no differences in preoperative data. The open operation was performed through a 15-mm incision. The video-assisted techniques used were minimally invasive video-assisted parathyroidectomy (MIVAP) or video-assisted parathyroidectomy using the lateral approach (VAPLA). Data were collected prospectively including postoperative pain scoring. Results: The procedure was significantly quicker for the open compared to the video assisted operations: mean(s.d.) 60(35) versus 84(47) min (P = 0.001). Both groups of patients had similar conversion rates and the same outcome, with comparable incision lengths, low scores for postoperative neck discomfort, high cosmetic satisfaction and low complication rates. Conclusion: Open minimally invasive parathyroidectomy for primary hyperparathyroidism was quicker than either video-assisted technique. Registration number: NCT00877981 (http://www.clinicaltrials.gov)},
  author       = {Hessman, O. and Westerdahl, Johan and Al-Suliman, N. and Christiansen, P. and Hellman, P. and Bergenfelz, Anders},
  issn         = {1365-2168},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {177--184},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {British Journal of Surgery},
  title        = {Randomized clinical trial comparing open with video-assisted minimally invasive parathyroid surgery for primary hyperparathyroidism},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bjs.6810},
  volume       = {97},
  year         = {2010},
}