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Metabolic and Lifestyle related risk factors for pancreatic cancer

Johansen, Dorthe LU (2010) In Lund University, Faculty of Medicine Doctoral Dissertation Series 2010:29.
Abstract
Background and aims: In spite of the fact that pancreatic cancer is a relatively infrequent disease, it ranks

8th in the worldwide ranking of cancer death due to the poor prognosis. The mortality rate is almost as

high as the incidence with a M/I ratio of 98%, indicating an extremely dismal clinical course. This makes

it imperative to try to develop new therapeutic strategies and to try to identify risk factors in order to intensify

preventive efforts. The most important risk factor for pancreatic cancer is tobacco smoking, but

there are other putative environmental risk factors and some pre-existing diseases that have been linked

to pancreatic cancer. The aim of this thesis is to... (More)
Background and aims: In spite of the fact that pancreatic cancer is a relatively infrequent disease, it ranks

8th in the worldwide ranking of cancer death due to the poor prognosis. The mortality rate is almost as

high as the incidence with a M/I ratio of 98%, indicating an extremely dismal clinical course. This makes

it imperative to try to develop new therapeutic strategies and to try to identify risk factors in order to intensify

preventive efforts. The most important risk factor for pancreatic cancer is tobacco smoking, but

there are other putative environmental risk factors and some pre-existing diseases that have been linked

to pancreatic cancer. The aim of this thesis is to evaluate different epidemiological aspects in relation to

pancreatic cancer; in more specific terms to investigate the relation between alcohol and pancreatic cancer,

between trypsinogen, pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor (PSTI) and pancreatic cancer, between Helicobacter

pylori infection and pancreatic cancer and to investigate if the metabolic syndrome is associated

with the risk of pancreatic cancer.

Results and conclusion: High alcohol intake, estimated using both a questionnaire on attitude towards

alcohol and a laboratory marker in the form of γ-GT is associated with a subsequent high risk of developing

pancreatic cancer. The previously established association between smoking and pancreatic cancer

is confirmed. The hypothesis that pancreatic cancer is related to an imbalance between the trypsinogen

isoforms is in line with the finding concerning the ratio of human anionic trypsinogen and human cationic

trypsinogen (HAT/HCT). There is no overall association between H.pylori infection and the risk of

pancreatic cancer, but H.pylori infection may increase the risk of pancreatic cancer in never smokers and

in low alcohol consumers. High mid-blood pressure, high fasting glucose and the metabolic syndrome as

an entity are associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer in women. In men, high mid-blood

pressure is associated with the risk of pancreatic cancer and there is an indication of an association between

high glucose levels and the risk of pancreatic cancer. Growing evidence have consistently shown that obesity,

diabetes, metabolic factors, smoking and alcohol are associated with a high risk of pancreatic cancer. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
supervisor
opponent
  • Prof. Bergkvist, Leif, Centrum för klinisk forskning, Kirurgiska kliniken, Centrallasarettet Västerås
organization
publishing date
type
Thesis
publication status
published
subject
keywords
trypsinogen, body mass index, alcohol consumption, smoking, Keywords: Pancreatic cancer, epidemiology, pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor, Helicobacter pylori, metabolic syndrome.
in
Lund University, Faculty of Medicine Doctoral Dissertation Series
volume
2010:29
pages
130 pages
publisher
Lund University. Department of Clinical Science, Surgery. Skåne University Hospital, Malmö
defense location
CRC, föreläsningssalen, Malmö
defense date
2010-04-16 13:15
ISSN
1652-8220
ISBN
978-91-86443-44-3
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
2a9130eb-067a-4804-aae3-2490e9a93a77 (old id 1579070)
date added to LUP
2010-03-26 13:27:48
date last changed
2018-05-29 11:00:33
@phdthesis{2a9130eb-067a-4804-aae3-2490e9a93a77,
  abstract     = {Background and aims: In spite of the fact that pancreatic cancer is a relatively infrequent disease, it ranks<br/><br>
8th in the worldwide ranking of cancer death due to the poor prognosis. The mortality rate is almost as<br/><br>
high as the incidence with a M/I ratio of 98%, indicating an extremely dismal clinical course. This makes<br/><br>
it imperative to try to develop new therapeutic strategies and to try to identify risk factors in order to intensify<br/><br>
preventive efforts. The most important risk factor for pancreatic cancer is tobacco smoking, but<br/><br>
there are other putative environmental risk factors and some pre-existing diseases that have been linked<br/><br>
to pancreatic cancer. The aim of this thesis is to evaluate different epidemiological aspects in relation to<br/><br>
pancreatic cancer; in more specific terms to investigate the relation between alcohol and pancreatic cancer,<br/><br>
between trypsinogen, pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor (PSTI) and pancreatic cancer, between Helicobacter<br/><br>
pylori infection and pancreatic cancer and to investigate if the metabolic syndrome is associated<br/><br>
with the risk of pancreatic cancer.<br/><br>
Results and conclusion: High alcohol intake, estimated using both a questionnaire on attitude towards<br/><br>
alcohol and a laboratory marker in the form of γ-GT is associated with a subsequent high risk of developing<br/><br>
pancreatic cancer. The previously established association between smoking and pancreatic cancer<br/><br>
is confirmed. The hypothesis that pancreatic cancer is related to an imbalance between the trypsinogen<br/><br>
isoforms is in line with the finding concerning the ratio of human anionic trypsinogen and human cationic<br/><br>
trypsinogen (HAT/HCT). There is no overall association between H.pylori infection and the risk of<br/><br>
pancreatic cancer, but H.pylori infection may increase the risk of pancreatic cancer in never smokers and<br/><br>
in low alcohol consumers. High mid-blood pressure, high fasting glucose and the metabolic syndrome as<br/><br>
an entity are associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer in women. In men, high mid-blood<br/><br>
pressure is associated with the risk of pancreatic cancer and there is an indication of an association between<br/><br>
high glucose levels and the risk of pancreatic cancer. Growing evidence have consistently shown that obesity,<br/><br>
diabetes, metabolic factors, smoking and alcohol are associated with a high risk of pancreatic cancer.},
  author       = {Johansen, Dorthe},
  isbn         = {978-91-86443-44-3},
  issn         = {1652-8220},
  keyword      = {trypsinogen,body mass index,alcohol consumption,smoking,Keywords: Pancreatic cancer,epidemiology,pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor,Helicobacter pylori,metabolic syndrome.},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {130},
  publisher    = {Lund University. Department of Clinical Science, Surgery. Skåne University Hospital, Malmö},
  school       = {Lund University},
  series       = {Lund University, Faculty of Medicine Doctoral Dissertation Series},
  title        = {Metabolic and Lifestyle related risk factors for pancreatic cancer},
  volume       = {2010:29},
  year         = {2010},
}