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Reliability of Gait Performance Tests in Individuals With Late Effects of Polio.

Flansbjer, Ulla-Britt LU and Lexell, Jan LU (2010) In PM&R 2(2). p.125-131
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To assess the reliability of 4 gait performance tests in individuals with late effects of polio. DESIGN: An intrarater (between occasions) test-retest reliability study. SETTINGS: University hospital. PARTICIPANTS: Thirty men and women (mean age 63 +/- 6.4 years) with clinically and electrophysiologically verified late effects of polio. INTERVENTION: Not applicable. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The Timed "Up & Go" test, the Comfortable and the Fast Gait Speed tests, and the 6-Minute Walk test were assessed 7 days apart. Reliability was evaluated with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC(2,1)), the mean difference between the test sessions (d), and the 95% confidence intervals for d, the standard error of measurement (SEM... (More)
OBJECTIVE: To assess the reliability of 4 gait performance tests in individuals with late effects of polio. DESIGN: An intrarater (between occasions) test-retest reliability study. SETTINGS: University hospital. PARTICIPANTS: Thirty men and women (mean age 63 +/- 6.4 years) with clinically and electrophysiologically verified late effects of polio. INTERVENTION: Not applicable. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The Timed "Up & Go" test, the Comfortable and the Fast Gait Speed tests, and the 6-Minute Walk test were assessed 7 days apart. Reliability was evaluated with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC(2,1)), the mean difference between the test sessions (d), and the 95% confidence intervals for d, the standard error of measurement (SEM and SEM%), the smallest real difference (SRD and SRD%) and the Bland & Altman graphs. RESULTS: Test-retest agreements were high (ICC(2,1) 0.82-0.97) and measurement errors generally small. The standard error of measurement (SEM%), representing the smallest change that indicates a real (clinical) improvement for a group of individuals, was small (4%-7%). The smallest real difference (SRD%), representing the smallest change that indicates a real (clinical) improvement for a single individual also was small (12%-21%). CONCLUSION: These commonly used gait performance tests are highly reliable and can be recommended to evaluate improvements in various aspects of gait performance in groups of individuals as well as single individuals with late effects of polio. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
PM&R
volume
2
issue
2
pages
125 - 131
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000208361100007
  • pmid:20193939
  • scopus:77449113707
ISSN
1934-1563
DOI
10.1016/j.pmrj.2009.12.006
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f2751754-4d48-4653-bf91-92381701e494 (old id 1582679)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20193939?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2010-04-08 08:30:20
date last changed
2018-05-29 10:54:03
@article{f2751754-4d48-4653-bf91-92381701e494,
  abstract     = {OBJECTIVE: To assess the reliability of 4 gait performance tests in individuals with late effects of polio. DESIGN: An intrarater (between occasions) test-retest reliability study. SETTINGS: University hospital. PARTICIPANTS: Thirty men and women (mean age 63 +/- 6.4 years) with clinically and electrophysiologically verified late effects of polio. INTERVENTION: Not applicable. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The Timed "Up & Go" test, the Comfortable and the Fast Gait Speed tests, and the 6-Minute Walk test were assessed 7 days apart. Reliability was evaluated with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC(2,1)), the mean difference between the test sessions (d), and the 95% confidence intervals for d, the standard error of measurement (SEM and SEM%), the smallest real difference (SRD and SRD%) and the Bland & Altman graphs. RESULTS: Test-retest agreements were high (ICC(2,1) 0.82-0.97) and measurement errors generally small. The standard error of measurement (SEM%), representing the smallest change that indicates a real (clinical) improvement for a group of individuals, was small (4%-7%). The smallest real difference (SRD%), representing the smallest change that indicates a real (clinical) improvement for a single individual also was small (12%-21%). CONCLUSION: These commonly used gait performance tests are highly reliable and can be recommended to evaluate improvements in various aspects of gait performance in groups of individuals as well as single individuals with late effects of polio.},
  author       = {Flansbjer, Ulla-Britt and Lexell, Jan},
  issn         = {1934-1563},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {125--131},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {PM&R},
  title        = {Reliability of Gait Performance Tests in Individuals With Late Effects of Polio.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pmrj.2009.12.006},
  volume       = {2},
  year         = {2010},
}