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Stressful Life Events and the Metabolic Syndrome - The Prevalence, Prediction and Prevention of Diabetes (PPP)-Botnia Study

Pyykkonen, Antti-Jussi; Raikkonen, Katri; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Eriksson, Johan G.; Groop, Leif LU and Isomaa, Bo (2010) In Diabetes Care 33(2). p.378-384
Abstract
OBJECTIVE - Stress may play a role in the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome. However, the scant evidence available is not population-based, restricting the external validity of the findings. Our aim was to test associations between stressful life events, their accumulation, and the metabolic syndrome in a large population-based cohort. We also tested associations between stress and the individual components related to the metabolic syndrome. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - This was a population-based, random sample of 3,407 women and men aged 18-78 years residing in Western Finland. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III and International Diabetes Federation... (More)
OBJECTIVE - Stress may play a role in the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome. However, the scant evidence available is not population-based, restricting the external validity of the findings. Our aim was to test associations between stressful life events, their accumulation, and the metabolic syndrome in a large population-based cohort. We also tested associations between stress and the individual components related to the metabolic syndrome. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - This was a population-based, random sample of 3,407 women and men aged 18-78 years residing in Western Finland. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III and International Diabetes Federation criteria. The severity of 15 stressful life events pertaining to finance, work, social relationships, health, and housing was self-rated. RESULTS - in comparison with subjects not reporting any extremely stressful life events, those reporting work- or finance-related events had an increased odds for having the metabolic syndrome. The risk was further increased according to accumulation of stressful finance-related events and to having at least three stressful life events in any of the life domains assessed. Accumulation Of stressful life events was associated with insulin resistance, obesity, and triglycerides. The associations were not confounded by sex, age, lifestyle, or family history of diabetes. CONCLUSIONS - Life events perceived as stressful, particularly those related to finance and work, may be a signal for poor metabolic health. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Diabetes Care
volume
33
issue
2
pages
378 - 384
publisher
American Diabetes Association
external identifiers
  • wos:000275143700034
  • scopus:75149151977
ISSN
1935-5548
DOI
10.2337/dc09-1027
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
eb3f6776-6b3f-4832-b9f2-36a8c4bcc6dd (old id 1589663)
date added to LUP
2010-04-20 09:43:21
date last changed
2018-07-15 04:00:13
@article{eb3f6776-6b3f-4832-b9f2-36a8c4bcc6dd,
  abstract     = {OBJECTIVE - Stress may play a role in the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome. However, the scant evidence available is not population-based, restricting the external validity of the findings. Our aim was to test associations between stressful life events, their accumulation, and the metabolic syndrome in a large population-based cohort. We also tested associations between stress and the individual components related to the metabolic syndrome. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - This was a population-based, random sample of 3,407 women and men aged 18-78 years residing in Western Finland. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III and International Diabetes Federation criteria. The severity of 15 stressful life events pertaining to finance, work, social relationships, health, and housing was self-rated. RESULTS - in comparison with subjects not reporting any extremely stressful life events, those reporting work- or finance-related events had an increased odds for having the metabolic syndrome. The risk was further increased according to accumulation of stressful finance-related events and to having at least three stressful life events in any of the life domains assessed. Accumulation Of stressful life events was associated with insulin resistance, obesity, and triglycerides. The associations were not confounded by sex, age, lifestyle, or family history of diabetes. CONCLUSIONS - Life events perceived as stressful, particularly those related to finance and work, may be a signal for poor metabolic health.},
  author       = {Pyykkonen, Antti-Jussi and Raikkonen, Katri and Tuomi, Tiinamaija and Eriksson, Johan G. and Groop, Leif and Isomaa, Bo},
  issn         = {1935-5548},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {378--384},
  publisher    = {American Diabetes Association},
  series       = {Diabetes Care},
  title        = {Stressful Life Events and the Metabolic Syndrome - The Prevalence, Prediction and Prevention of Diabetes (PPP)-Botnia Study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2337/dc09-1027},
  volume       = {33},
  year         = {2010},
}