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Abnormal urethral motor function is common in female stress, mixed, and urge incontinence.

Mattiasson, Anders LU and Teleman, Pia LU (2006) In Neurourology and Urodynamics 25(7). p.703-708
Abstract
Aim: To investigate the urethral motor function in incontinent women. Materials and Methods: The intraurethral pressure was measured continuously in the high-pressure zone of the urethra at rest and during repeated short squeezes around the microtip transducer catheter in a group of 205 women with clinically manifest urinary incontinence (severe), and compared with the findings of investigations in 87 middle-aged women (53-63 years) with treatment naive incontinence (mild-to-mode rate) and healthy controls. Results: Women with established incontinence significantly (P < 0.001) more often (66%) had a pressure fall during or immediately following squeeze than women with treatment naive incontinence (35%) or asymptomatic women (25%). The... (More)
Aim: To investigate the urethral motor function in incontinent women. Materials and Methods: The intraurethral pressure was measured continuously in the high-pressure zone of the urethra at rest and during repeated short squeezes around the microtip transducer catheter in a group of 205 women with clinically manifest urinary incontinence (severe), and compared with the findings of investigations in 87 middle-aged women (53-63 years) with treatment naive incontinence (mild-to-mode rate) and healthy controls. Results: Women with established incontinence significantly (P < 0.001) more often (66%) had a pressure fall during or immediately following squeeze than women with treatment naive incontinence (35%) or asymptomatic women (25%). The acceleration of urinary flow and the maximal flow rate were significantly (P < 0.01) increased in patients with incontinence: acceleration was 13 +/- 2.2 (17.8), 20 +/- 2.8 (18.9), and 32 +/- 4.9 (24.9) degrees (mean +/- SEM;SD) for incontinence, naive incontinence and no incontinence, respectively; maximum urinary flow rate was 23, 22, and 16 ml/sec. No statistical differences in any of these measures were seen when stress and urge incontinence were compared. Conclusion: Women with stress, urge, and mixed urinary incontinence seem to have a primary neuromuscular disorder in the urethra, which presents itself as an overactive opening mechanism with a urethral pressure fall instead of a pressure increase on provocation during the filling phase of the bladder, and during bladder emptying a more efficient opening of the bladder outlet than in normal women. We suggest that one and the same pathophysiological mechanism participates in female stress, urge, and mixed incontinence. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
urethral opening, urethra, urethral, sphincter, female urinary incontinence
in
Neurourology and Urodynamics
volume
25
issue
7
pages
703 - 708
publisher
John Wiley and Sons
external identifiers
  • wos:000241717700007
  • scopus:33750633046
ISSN
0733-2467
DOI
10.1002/nau.20207
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
4e4b85b8-0356-4d77-aa7d-551dc0adc249 (old id 160177)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=16897750&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 12:07:29
date last changed
2021-05-25 04:42:15
@article{4e4b85b8-0356-4d77-aa7d-551dc0adc249,
  abstract     = {Aim: To investigate the urethral motor function in incontinent women. Materials and Methods: The intraurethral pressure was measured continuously in the high-pressure zone of the urethra at rest and during repeated short squeezes around the microtip transducer catheter in a group of 205 women with clinically manifest urinary incontinence (severe), and compared with the findings of investigations in 87 middle-aged women (53-63 years) with treatment naive incontinence (mild-to-mode rate) and healthy controls. Results: Women with established incontinence significantly (P &lt; 0.001) more often (66%) had a pressure fall during or immediately following squeeze than women with treatment naive incontinence (35%) or asymptomatic women (25%). The acceleration of urinary flow and the maximal flow rate were significantly (P &lt; 0.01) increased in patients with incontinence: acceleration was 13 +/- 2.2 (17.8), 20 +/- 2.8 (18.9), and 32 +/- 4.9 (24.9) degrees (mean +/- SEM;SD) for incontinence, naive incontinence and no incontinence, respectively; maximum urinary flow rate was 23, 22, and 16 ml/sec. No statistical differences in any of these measures were seen when stress and urge incontinence were compared. Conclusion: Women with stress, urge, and mixed urinary incontinence seem to have a primary neuromuscular disorder in the urethra, which presents itself as an overactive opening mechanism with a urethral pressure fall instead of a pressure increase on provocation during the filling phase of the bladder, and during bladder emptying a more efficient opening of the bladder outlet than in normal women. We suggest that one and the same pathophysiological mechanism participates in female stress, urge, and mixed incontinence.},
  author       = {Mattiasson, Anders and Teleman, Pia},
  issn         = {0733-2467},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {703--708},
  publisher    = {John Wiley and Sons},
  series       = {Neurourology and Urodynamics},
  title        = {Abnormal urethral motor function is common in female stress, mixed, and urge incontinence.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/nau.20207},
  doi          = {10.1002/nau.20207},
  volume       = {25},
  year         = {2006},
}