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The role of ectomycorrhizal communities in forest ecosystem processes: New perspectives and emerging concepts

Courty, Pierre-Emmanuel; Buee, Marc; Diedhiou, Abdala Gamby; Frey-Klett, Pascale; Le Tacon, Francois; Rineau, Francois LU ; Turpault, Marie-Pierre; Uroz, Stephane and Garbaye, Jean (2010) In Soil Biology & Biochemistry 42(5). p.679-698
Abstract
The fungal symbionts forming ectomycorrhizas, as well as their associated bacteria, benefit forest trees in a number of ways although the most important is enhancing soil nutrient mobilization and uptake. This is reciprocated by the allocation of carbohydrates by the tree to the fungus through the root interface, making the relationship a mutualistic association. Many field observations suggest that ectomycorrhizal fungi contribute to a number of key ecosystem functions such as carbon cycling, nutrient mobilization from soil organic matter, nutrient mobilization from soil minerals, and linking trees through common mycorrhizal networks. Until now, it has been very difficult to study trees and their fungal associates in forest ecosystems and... (More)
The fungal symbionts forming ectomycorrhizas, as well as their associated bacteria, benefit forest trees in a number of ways although the most important is enhancing soil nutrient mobilization and uptake. This is reciprocated by the allocation of carbohydrates by the tree to the fungus through the root interface, making the relationship a mutualistic association. Many field observations suggest that ectomycorrhizal fungi contribute to a number of key ecosystem functions such as carbon cycling, nutrient mobilization from soil organic matter, nutrient mobilization from soil minerals, and linking trees through common mycorrhizal networks. Until now, it has been very difficult to study trees and their fungal associates in forest ecosystems and most of the work on ECM functioning has been done in laboratory or nursery conditions. In this review with discuss the possibility of working at another scale, in forest settings. Numerous new techniques are emerging that makes possible the in situ study of the functional diversity of ectomycorrhizal communities. This approach should help to integrate developing research on the functional ecology of ectomycorrhizas and their associated bacteria with the potential implications of such research for managing the effects of climate change on forests. (C) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Ectomycorrhiza, Forest, Community structure, Functional diversity, Carbon cycling, Nutrient mobilization, Fungal networks, Fungi
in
Soil Biology & Biochemistry
volume
42
issue
5
pages
679 - 698
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000276753900002
  • scopus:77949264942
ISSN
0038-0717
DOI
10.1016/j.soilbio.2009.12.006
project
Climate Initiative
BECC
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
2ca234fd-a3ba-4a57-84bd-04914d93ea36 (old id 1601945)
date added to LUP
2010-05-19 11:10:11
date last changed
2018-07-15 03:53:58
@article{2ca234fd-a3ba-4a57-84bd-04914d93ea36,
  abstract     = {The fungal symbionts forming ectomycorrhizas, as well as their associated bacteria, benefit forest trees in a number of ways although the most important is enhancing soil nutrient mobilization and uptake. This is reciprocated by the allocation of carbohydrates by the tree to the fungus through the root interface, making the relationship a mutualistic association. Many field observations suggest that ectomycorrhizal fungi contribute to a number of key ecosystem functions such as carbon cycling, nutrient mobilization from soil organic matter, nutrient mobilization from soil minerals, and linking trees through common mycorrhizal networks. Until now, it has been very difficult to study trees and their fungal associates in forest ecosystems and most of the work on ECM functioning has been done in laboratory or nursery conditions. In this review with discuss the possibility of working at another scale, in forest settings. Numerous new techniques are emerging that makes possible the in situ study of the functional diversity of ectomycorrhizal communities. This approach should help to integrate developing research on the functional ecology of ectomycorrhizas and their associated bacteria with the potential implications of such research for managing the effects of climate change on forests. (C) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Courty, Pierre-Emmanuel and Buee, Marc and Diedhiou, Abdala Gamby and Frey-Klett, Pascale and Le Tacon, Francois and Rineau, Francois and Turpault, Marie-Pierre and Uroz, Stephane and Garbaye, Jean},
  issn         = {0038-0717},
  keyword      = {Ectomycorrhiza,Forest,Community structure,Functional diversity,Carbon cycling,Nutrient mobilization,Fungal networks,Fungi},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {679--698},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Soil Biology & Biochemistry},
  title        = {The role of ectomycorrhizal communities in forest ecosystem processes: New perspectives and emerging concepts},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.soilbio.2009.12.006},
  volume       = {42},
  year         = {2010},
}