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Exhaustion is differentiable from depression and anxiety: Evidence provided by the SF-36 vitality scale.

Lindeberg, Sara LU ; Östergren, Per-Olof LU and Lindbladh, Eva LU (2006) In Stress 9(2). p.117-123
Abstract
Stress-related exhaustion is an increasingly focused phenomenon, although scientifically not yet fully conceptualised. This is perhaps partly due to the fact that the distinction between exhaustion and other already established concepts, such as depression, is not clear. This study explores whether exhaustion can be differentiated from depression and anxiety, by means of introducing the SF-36 vitality scale as a strategy for the measurement of exhaustion. The Malmö Shoulder and Neck Study cohort, in this study including 12,607 middle-aged men and women, was utilized. Depression and anxiety were assessed by the general health questionnaire (GHQ). Factor analysis was performed in order to potentially discriminate between the included... (More)
Stress-related exhaustion is an increasingly focused phenomenon, although scientifically not yet fully conceptualised. This is perhaps partly due to the fact that the distinction between exhaustion and other already established concepts, such as depression, is not clear. This study explores whether exhaustion can be differentiated from depression and anxiety, by means of introducing the SF-36 vitality scale as a strategy for the measurement of exhaustion. The Malmö Shoulder and Neck Study cohort, in this study including 12,607 middle-aged men and women, was utilized. Depression and anxiety were assessed by the general health questionnaire (GHQ). Factor analysis was performed in order to potentially discriminate between the included measures. Factor analysis showed that all four exhaustion items of the (inverted) SF-36 vitality scale loaded on a single factor, separate from the GHQ depression and anxiety factors. These results support the notion that exhaustion can be distinguished from depression and anxiety, providing an empirical foundation for defining exhaustion as a unique concept. Furthermore, since SF-36 has been widely used in clinical and epidemiological studies, the benefits of using the SF-36 vitality scale in the assessment of exhaustion could be substantial. (Less)
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author
; and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Anxiety, chronic stress, depression, exhaustion, SF-36 vitality scale
in
Stress
volume
9
issue
2
pages
117 - 123
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • pmid:16895835
  • wos:000241211600006
  • scopus:33747131439
ISSN
1025-3890
DOI
10.1080/10253890600823485
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
5b7a68dd-e698-43c4-bd56-938c82e4eb28 (old id 160202)
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 17:03:26
date last changed
2021-03-24 02:31:42
@article{5b7a68dd-e698-43c4-bd56-938c82e4eb28,
  abstract     = {Stress-related exhaustion is an increasingly focused phenomenon, although scientifically not yet fully conceptualised. This is perhaps partly due to the fact that the distinction between exhaustion and other already established concepts, such as depression, is not clear. This study explores whether exhaustion can be differentiated from depression and anxiety, by means of introducing the SF-36 vitality scale as a strategy for the measurement of exhaustion. The Malmö Shoulder and Neck Study cohort, in this study including 12,607 middle-aged men and women, was utilized. Depression and anxiety were assessed by the general health questionnaire (GHQ). Factor analysis was performed in order to potentially discriminate between the included measures. Factor analysis showed that all four exhaustion items of the (inverted) SF-36 vitality scale loaded on a single factor, separate from the GHQ depression and anxiety factors. These results support the notion that exhaustion can be distinguished from depression and anxiety, providing an empirical foundation for defining exhaustion as a unique concept. Furthermore, since SF-36 has been widely used in clinical and epidemiological studies, the benefits of using the SF-36 vitality scale in the assessment of exhaustion could be substantial.},
  author       = {Lindeberg, Sara and Östergren, Per-Olof and Lindbladh, Eva},
  issn         = {1025-3890},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {117--123},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Stress},
  title        = {Exhaustion is differentiable from depression and anxiety: Evidence provided by the SF-36 vitality scale.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10253890600823485},
  doi          = {10.1080/10253890600823485},
  volume       = {9},
  year         = {2006},
}