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Swedish health care providers' experience and knowledge of female genital cutting.

Tamaddon, Leila ; Johnsdotter Carlbom, Sara LU ; Liljestrand, Jerker LU and Essén, Birgitta LU (2006) In Health Care for Women International 27(8). p.22-709
Abstract
We sought to evaluate the experiences and knowledge of health care providers in Sweden regarding female genital cutting (FGC) as a health issue. Questionnaires (n = 2,707) were sent to providers in four major cities in Sweden and evaluated by means of descriptive statistics. Twenty-eight percent (n = 769/2,707) responded, of whom 60% had seen such patients. Seven providers, including 2 pediatricians, were suspicious of patients with signs of recent genital cutting. Ten percent had been asked to perform reinfibulation after delivery. Thirty-eight providers had received inquiries about the possibility of performing FGC in Sweden.A majority of Swedish health care providers meet patients presenting with evidence of FGC performed long ago.... (More)
We sought to evaluate the experiences and knowledge of health care providers in Sweden regarding female genital cutting (FGC) as a health issue. Questionnaires (n = 2,707) were sent to providers in four major cities in Sweden and evaluated by means of descriptive statistics. Twenty-eight percent (n = 769/2,707) responded, of whom 60% had seen such patients. Seven providers, including 2 pediatricians, were suspicious of patients with signs of recent genital cutting. Ten percent had been asked to perform reinfibulation after delivery. Thirty-eight providers had received inquiries about the possibility of performing FGC in Sweden.A majority of Swedish health care providers meet patients presenting with evidence of FGC performed long ago. However, very few of them have suspected recently cut patients. The results support the hypothesis that this practice is not as active among African immigrants in Sweden as in their countries of origin. If the prevalence was the same as in African countries, more pediatricians would be expected to meet current cut girls. National efforts and policy programs to prevent FGC in Sweden are recommended as effective, in accordance with current research and should especially be directed toward pediatricians. (Less)
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author
; ; and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Health Care for Women International
volume
27
issue
8
pages
22 - 709
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • scopus:33747164238
ISSN
1096-4665
DOI
10.1080/07399330600817741
language
English
LU publication?
yes
additional info
The information about affiliations in this record was updated in December 2015. The record was previously connected to the following departments: Division of Social Medicine and Global Health (013241820), Pediatrics/Urology/Gynecology/Endocrinology (013240400), Social Anthropology (012013002)
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f16248ff-fb8a-440f-8183-41824d5a6239 (old id 160237)
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 12:38:23
date last changed
2021-09-01 02:23:07
@article{f16248ff-fb8a-440f-8183-41824d5a6239,
  abstract     = {We sought to evaluate the experiences and knowledge of health care providers in Sweden regarding female genital cutting (FGC) as a health issue. Questionnaires (n = 2,707) were sent to providers in four major cities in Sweden and evaluated by means of descriptive statistics. Twenty-eight percent (n = 769/2,707) responded, of whom 60% had seen such patients. Seven providers, including 2 pediatricians, were suspicious of patients with signs of recent genital cutting. Ten percent had been asked to perform reinfibulation after delivery. Thirty-eight providers had received inquiries about the possibility of performing FGC in Sweden.A majority of Swedish health care providers meet patients presenting with evidence of FGC performed long ago. However, very few of them have suspected recently cut patients. The results support the hypothesis that this practice is not as active among African immigrants in Sweden as in their countries of origin. If the prevalence was the same as in African countries, more pediatricians would be expected to meet current cut girls. National efforts and policy programs to prevent FGC in Sweden are recommended as effective, in accordance with current research and should especially be directed toward pediatricians.},
  author       = {Tamaddon, Leila and Johnsdotter Carlbom, Sara and Liljestrand, Jerker and Essén, Birgitta},
  issn         = {1096-4665},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {8},
  pages        = {22--709},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Health Care for Women International},
  title        = {Swedish health care providers' experience and knowledge of female genital cutting.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07399330600817741},
  doi          = {10.1080/07399330600817741},
  volume       = {27},
  year         = {2006},
}