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The immunobiology of aluminium adjuvants: how do they really work?

Exley, Christopher; Siesjö, Peter LU and Eriksson, Håkan (2010) In Trends in Immunology2001-01-01+01:00 31(3). p.103-109
Abstract
Aluminium adjuvants potentiate the immune response, thereby ensuring the potency and efficacy of typically sparingly available antigen. Their concomitant critical importance in mass vaccination programmes may have prompted recent intense interest in understanding how they work and their safety. Progress in these areas is stymied, however, by a lack of accessible knowledge pertaining to the bioinorganic chemistry of aluminium adjuvants, and, consequently, the inappropriate application and interpretation of experimental models of their mode of action. The objective herein is, therefore, to identify the many ways that aluminium chemistry contributes to the wide and versatile armoury of its adjuvants, such that future research might be guided... (More)
Aluminium adjuvants potentiate the immune response, thereby ensuring the potency and efficacy of typically sparingly available antigen. Their concomitant critical importance in mass vaccination programmes may have prompted recent intense interest in understanding how they work and their safety. Progress in these areas is stymied, however, by a lack of accessible knowledge pertaining to the bioinorganic chemistry of aluminium adjuvants, and, consequently, the inappropriate application and interpretation of experimental models of their mode of action. The objective herein is, therefore, to identify the many ways that aluminium chemistry contributes to the wide and versatile armoury of its adjuvants, such that future research might be guided towards a fuller understanding of their role in human vaccinations. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Trends in Immunology2001-01-01+01:00
volume
31
issue
3
pages
103 - 109
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000276436700005
  • scopus:77949330370
ISSN
1471-4981
DOI
10.1016/j.it.2009.12.009
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
2c587936-b24e-48ba-bed4-c64535b0ca2f (old id 1603369)
date added to LUP
2010-05-19 09:03:21
date last changed
2018-05-29 11:50:26
@article{2c587936-b24e-48ba-bed4-c64535b0ca2f,
  abstract     = {Aluminium adjuvants potentiate the immune response, thereby ensuring the potency and efficacy of typically sparingly available antigen. Their concomitant critical importance in mass vaccination programmes may have prompted recent intense interest in understanding how they work and their safety. Progress in these areas is stymied, however, by a lack of accessible knowledge pertaining to the bioinorganic chemistry of aluminium adjuvants, and, consequently, the inappropriate application and interpretation of experimental models of their mode of action. The objective herein is, therefore, to identify the many ways that aluminium chemistry contributes to the wide and versatile armoury of its adjuvants, such that future research might be guided towards a fuller understanding of their role in human vaccinations.},
  author       = {Exley, Christopher and Siesjö, Peter and Eriksson, Håkan},
  issn         = {1471-4981},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {103--109},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Trends in Immunology2001-01-01+01:00},
  title        = {The immunobiology of aluminium adjuvants: how do they really work?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.it.2009.12.009},
  volume       = {31},
  year         = {2010},
}