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Roles of Heparin-Binding Protein in Bacterial Infections.

Linder, Adam LU ; Soehnlein, Oliver and Åkesson, Per LU (2010) In Journal of Innate Immunity 2. p.431-438
Abstract
Infectious diseases remain a major health problem, where sepsis and other severe infectious diseases are common causes of morbidity and mortality. The importance of early and appropriate treatment of sepsis and severe bacterial infections has been underlined by the successes of measures like the Surviving Sepsis Campaign, among others. Thus, there is a need for clinical and laboratory tools to identify a patient with severe infection early and to distinguish between bacterial and non-bacterial conditions. Heparin-binding protein (HBP) is also called azurocidin, or cationic antimicrobial protein of 37 kDa (CAP37). It is a multifunctional granule-associated protein that is rapidly mobilized from migrating polymorphonuclear leukocytes. HBP... (More)
Infectious diseases remain a major health problem, where sepsis and other severe infectious diseases are common causes of morbidity and mortality. The importance of early and appropriate treatment of sepsis and severe bacterial infections has been underlined by the successes of measures like the Surviving Sepsis Campaign, among others. Thus, there is a need for clinical and laboratory tools to identify a patient with severe infection early and to distinguish between bacterial and non-bacterial conditions. Heparin-binding protein (HBP) is also called azurocidin, or cationic antimicrobial protein of 37 kDa (CAP37). It is a multifunctional granule-associated protein that is rapidly mobilized from migrating polymorphonuclear leukocytes. HBP acts as a chemoattractant, an activator of monocytes and macrophages, and induces vascular leakage and edema formation. The release of HBP is triggered by ligation of neutrophilic beta(2)-integrins, a process that may be initiated by bacterial structures. The overall outcome is powerful vascular leakage. It has been shown that patients with severe sepsis express high levels of HBP in plasma before they develop hypotension. HBP is also involved in the pathophysiology of soft tissue infection. In conclusion, this protein is strongly involved in the pathophysiology of severe bacterial infections, and thus represents a potential diagnostic marker and a target for treatment. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Innate Immunity
volume
2
pages
431 - 438
publisher
Karger
external identifiers
  • wos:000281211300006
  • pmid:20505311
  • scopus:77956054430
ISSN
1662-811X
DOI
10.1159/000314853
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
7476509e-693b-4b7f-bfbd-4bda2647c292 (old id 1609888)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20505311?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2010-06-02 15:19:24
date last changed
2018-07-01 04:22:50
@article{7476509e-693b-4b7f-bfbd-4bda2647c292,
  abstract     = {Infectious diseases remain a major health problem, where sepsis and other severe infectious diseases are common causes of morbidity and mortality. The importance of early and appropriate treatment of sepsis and severe bacterial infections has been underlined by the successes of measures like the Surviving Sepsis Campaign, among others. Thus, there is a need for clinical and laboratory tools to identify a patient with severe infection early and to distinguish between bacterial and non-bacterial conditions. Heparin-binding protein (HBP) is also called azurocidin, or cationic antimicrobial protein of 37 kDa (CAP37). It is a multifunctional granule-associated protein that is rapidly mobilized from migrating polymorphonuclear leukocytes. HBP acts as a chemoattractant, an activator of monocytes and macrophages, and induces vascular leakage and edema formation. The release of HBP is triggered by ligation of neutrophilic beta(2)-integrins, a process that may be initiated by bacterial structures. The overall outcome is powerful vascular leakage. It has been shown that patients with severe sepsis express high levels of HBP in plasma before they develop hypotension. HBP is also involved in the pathophysiology of soft tissue infection. In conclusion, this protein is strongly involved in the pathophysiology of severe bacterial infections, and thus represents a potential diagnostic marker and a target for treatment.},
  author       = {Linder, Adam and Soehnlein, Oliver and Åkesson, Per},
  issn         = {1662-811X},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {431--438},
  publisher    = {Karger},
  series       = {Journal of Innate Immunity},
  title        = {Roles of Heparin-Binding Protein in Bacterial Infections.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000314853},
  volume       = {2},
  year         = {2010},
}