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Evaluation of amylase testing as a tool for saliva screening of crime scene trace swabs.

Hedman, Johannes LU ; Dalin, Erik LU ; Rasmusson, Birgitta and Ansell, Ricky (2011) In Forensic Science International: Genetics 5(3). p.194-198
Abstract
Amylase testing has been used as a presumptive test for crime scene saliva for over three decades, mainly to locate saliva stains on surfaces. We have developed a saliva screening application for crime scene trace swabs, utilising an amylase sensitive paper (Phadebas((R)) Forensic Press test). Positive results were obtained for all tested dried saliva stains (0.5-32muL) with high or intermediate amylase activity (840 and 290kU/L). Results were typically obtained within 5min, and all samples that produced DNA profiles were positive. However, salivary amylase activities, as well as DNA concentrations, vary significantly between individuals. We show that there is no correlation between amylase activity and amount of DNA in fresh saliva. Even... (More)
Amylase testing has been used as a presumptive test for crime scene saliva for over three decades, mainly to locate saliva stains on surfaces. We have developed a saliva screening application for crime scene trace swabs, utilising an amylase sensitive paper (Phadebas((R)) Forensic Press test). Positive results were obtained for all tested dried saliva stains (0.5-32muL) with high or intermediate amylase activity (840 and 290kU/L). Results were typically obtained within 5min, and all samples that produced DNA profiles were positive. However, salivary amylase activities, as well as DNA concentrations, vary significantly between individuals. We show that there is no correlation between amylase activity and amount of DNA in fresh saliva. Even so, a positive amylase result indicates presence of saliva, and thereby presence of DNA. Amylase testing may be useful for screening in investigations where the number of DNA analyses is limited due to cost, e.g., in volume crime. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Forensic Science International: Genetics
volume
5
issue
3
pages
194 - 198
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000289193200019
  • pmid:20457099
  • scopus:79953897230
ISSN
1878-0326
DOI
10.1016/j.fsigen.2010.03.003
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
3c20c5b3-1dcb-488e-95cf-7811821b12f5 (old id 1610380)
date added to LUP
2010-06-02 13:06:34
date last changed
2017-11-05 03:24:51
@article{3c20c5b3-1dcb-488e-95cf-7811821b12f5,
  abstract     = {Amylase testing has been used as a presumptive test for crime scene saliva for over three decades, mainly to locate saliva stains on surfaces. We have developed a saliva screening application for crime scene trace swabs, utilising an amylase sensitive paper (Phadebas((R)) Forensic Press test). Positive results were obtained for all tested dried saliva stains (0.5-32muL) with high or intermediate amylase activity (840 and 290kU/L). Results were typically obtained within 5min, and all samples that produced DNA profiles were positive. However, salivary amylase activities, as well as DNA concentrations, vary significantly between individuals. We show that there is no correlation between amylase activity and amount of DNA in fresh saliva. Even so, a positive amylase result indicates presence of saliva, and thereby presence of DNA. Amylase testing may be useful for screening in investigations where the number of DNA analyses is limited due to cost, e.g., in volume crime.},
  author       = {Hedman, Johannes and Dalin, Erik and Rasmusson, Birgitta and Ansell, Ricky},
  issn         = {1878-0326},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {194--198},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Forensic Science International: Genetics},
  title        = {Evaluation of amylase testing as a tool for saliva screening of crime scene trace swabs.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fsigen.2010.03.003},
  volume       = {5},
  year         = {2011},
}