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How Noah, Jesus and Paul Became Captivating Figures: The Side Effects of the Canonization of Slavery Metaphors in Jewish and Christians Texts

Svartvik, Jesper LU (2005) In Journal of Greco-Roman Christianity and Judaism 2. p.168-227
Abstract
The article examines four motifs/textual corpora in the Bible which have been referred to by those in favour of slavery: (1) the Exodus motif, (2) the Curse of Noah, (3) the parables of Jesus, and (4) the epistles of Paul. It is argued in the article that Christianity, with its canonized metaphors of slavery actually delayed the abolition of slavery in the 19th century by relativizing and idealizing it. It is thus most crucial to note that one and the same collection of books may be interpreted and applied in diametrically opposite ways.
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to specialist publication or newspaper
publication status
published
subject
keywords
the historical Jesus, slavery, Curse of Noah, Exodus, Old Testament, New Testament, Paul, Epistle of Philemon, Antebellum South, Bible
categories
Popular Science
in
Journal of Greco-Roman Christianity and Judaism
volume
2
pages
168 - 227
publisher
Sheffield Phoenix Press
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ff69f53f-84e0-4afb-add7-dc9b97323b1d (old id 161616)
alternative location
http://www.sheffieldphoenix.com/showbook.asp?bkid=33
date added to LUP
2007-07-20 12:10:34
date last changed
2016-04-16 09:31:05
@misc{ff69f53f-84e0-4afb-add7-dc9b97323b1d,
  abstract     = {The article examines four motifs/textual corpora in the Bible which have been referred to by those in favour of slavery: (1) the Exodus motif, (2) the Curse of Noah, (3) the parables of Jesus, and (4) the epistles of Paul. It is argued in the article that Christianity, with its canonized metaphors of slavery actually delayed the abolition of slavery in the 19th century by relativizing and idealizing it. It is thus most crucial to note that one and the same collection of books may be interpreted and applied in diametrically opposite ways.},
  author       = {Svartvik, Jesper},
  keyword      = {the historical Jesus,slavery,Curse of Noah,Exodus,Old Testament,New Testament,Paul,Epistle of Philemon,Antebellum South,Bible},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {168--227},
  publisher    = {Sheffield Phoenix Press},
  series       = {Journal of Greco-Roman Christianity and Judaism},
  title        = {How Noah, Jesus and Paul Became Captivating Figures: The Side Effects of the Canonization of Slavery Metaphors in Jewish and Christians Texts},
  volume       = {2},
  year         = {2005},
}