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Prediction of Postoperative Pain After Mandibular Third Molar Surgery

Rudin, Åsa LU ; Eriksson, Lars; Liedholm, Rolf; List, Thomas and Werner, Mads LU (2010) In Journal of Orofacial Pain 24(2). p.189-196
Abstract
Aims: To evaluate the predictive potential of preoperative psychological and psychophysiological variables in estimating severity of postoperative pain following mandibular third molar surgery (MTMS). Methods: Following ethical committee approval and informed consent, 40 consecutive patients scheduled for MTMS were included. Preoperative psychometric indicators of anxiety, depression, and vulnerability were evaluated by patient questionnaires. Thermal thresholds and heat pain perception (1 second phasic stimuli: 44 degrees C to 48 degrees C) were evaluated with quantitative sensory testing techniques. Standardized surgery was performed during local anesthesia. Postoperative pain management was with rescue paracetamol and ibuprofen. The... (More)
Aims: To evaluate the predictive potential of preoperative psychological and psychophysiological variables in estimating severity of postoperative pain following mandibular third molar surgery (MTMS). Methods: Following ethical committee approval and informed consent, 40 consecutive patients scheduled for MTMS were included. Preoperative psychometric indicators of anxiety, depression, and vulnerability were evaluated by patient questionnaires. Thermal thresholds and heat pain perception (1 second phasic stimuli: 44 degrees C to 48 degrees C) were evaluated with quantitative sensory testing techniques. Standardized surgery was performed during local anesthesia. Postoperative pain management was with rescue paracetamol and ibuprofen. The patients were instructed to record each day their pain at rest and during dynamic conditions, and their requirement of analgesics for 14 days following surgery. Results: Thirty-eight patients completed the study. Eight patients were readmitted because of pain. During the postoperative period, one or more episodes of moderate to severe pain (>30 on a visual analog scale) was reported by 60% (23/38) at rest, 63% (24/38) during mouth-opening, and 73% (28138) during eating. In a multiple regression model, the combination of psychological vulnerability and beat pain perception rendered a predictive model that could account for 15 to 30% of the variance in postoperative pain during resting and dynamic conditions (P = .03 to.001).Conclusion: Implementation of clinically relevant preoperative screening methods may offer more efficacious postoperative pain therapies to pain-susceptible individuals undergoing mandibular third molar surgery. J OROFAC PAIN 2010;24:189-196 (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
predictive value of tests, postoperative, pain, mandibular third molar surgery, pain measurement/methods, quantitative sensory testing
in
Journal of Orofacial Pain
volume
24
issue
2
pages
189 - 196
publisher
Quintessence Publishing
external identifiers
  • wos:000277672600007
  • scopus:77954896201
ISSN
1064-6655
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
0a8abb39-a89b-410c-a7cd-74d48d505cbd (old id 1617760)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20401357
date added to LUP
2010-06-21 11:12:11
date last changed
2018-05-29 11:23:08
@article{0a8abb39-a89b-410c-a7cd-74d48d505cbd,
  abstract     = {Aims: To evaluate the predictive potential of preoperative psychological and psychophysiological variables in estimating severity of postoperative pain following mandibular third molar surgery (MTMS). Methods: Following ethical committee approval and informed consent, 40 consecutive patients scheduled for MTMS were included. Preoperative psychometric indicators of anxiety, depression, and vulnerability were evaluated by patient questionnaires. Thermal thresholds and heat pain perception (1 second phasic stimuli: 44 degrees C to 48 degrees C) were evaluated with quantitative sensory testing techniques. Standardized surgery was performed during local anesthesia. Postoperative pain management was with rescue paracetamol and ibuprofen. The patients were instructed to record each day their pain at rest and during dynamic conditions, and their requirement of analgesics for 14 days following surgery. Results: Thirty-eight patients completed the study. Eight patients were readmitted because of pain. During the postoperative period, one or more episodes of moderate to severe pain (>30 on a visual analog scale) was reported by 60% (23/38) at rest, 63% (24/38) during mouth-opening, and 73% (28138) during eating. In a multiple regression model, the combination of psychological vulnerability and beat pain perception rendered a predictive model that could account for 15 to 30% of the variance in postoperative pain during resting and dynamic conditions (P = .03 to.001).Conclusion: Implementation of clinically relevant preoperative screening methods may offer more efficacious postoperative pain therapies to pain-susceptible individuals undergoing mandibular third molar surgery. J OROFAC PAIN 2010;24:189-196},
  author       = {Rudin, Åsa and Eriksson, Lars and Liedholm, Rolf and List, Thomas and Werner, Mads},
  issn         = {1064-6655},
  keyword      = {predictive value of tests,postoperative,pain,mandibular third molar surgery,pain measurement/methods,quantitative sensory testing},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {189--196},
  publisher    = {Quintessence Publishing},
  series       = {Journal of Orofacial Pain},
  title        = {Prediction of Postoperative Pain After Mandibular Third Molar Surgery},
  volume       = {24},
  year         = {2010},
}