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Ethical Issues raised by Personalized Nutrition based on Genetic Information

Görman, Ulf LU (2006) In Genes & Nutrition 1(1). p.13-22
Abstract
Four principles are taken as basis for the ethical analysis: autonomy, nonmaleficence, beneficence, and justice. Health is understood as a limited aspect of wellbeing. Food is understood as an aspect of wellbeing, not only an instrument for health. Modern society is characterized by a tendency to identify wellbeing with external rather than subjective circumstances, to identify wellbeing with health, and to create exaggerated health expectations. Based upon this understanding, aspects of personalized nutrition are discussed: genetic testing, counselling, and fabrication of special dietary products. Today the predictive value of genetic tests for personal nutrition is limited, and experimental at best. Recommendations for the future:... (More)
Four principles are taken as basis for the ethical analysis: autonomy, nonmaleficence, beneficence, and justice. Health is understood as a limited aspect of wellbeing. Food is understood as an aspect of wellbeing, not only an instrument for health. Modern society is characterized by a tendency to identify wellbeing with external rather than subjective circumstances, to identify wellbeing with health, and to create exaggerated health expectations. Based upon this understanding, aspects of personalized nutrition are discussed: genetic testing, counselling, and fabrication of special dietary products. Today the predictive value of genetic tests for personal nutrition is limited, and experimental at best. Recommendations for the future: Personalized nutrition must be based on solid knowledge. Phenotypic analyses should be used when adequate. When a genetic test can have a clear advantage, this should be preferred. Opportunistic screening should only be used when clearly beneficial. Information concerning genetic tests, and counselling, should be made on a personal basis by specially trained persons. Marketing of genetic tests directly sold to the public should be discouraged. Fabrication of special products for personalized nutrition may be necessary in some cases. However, this may also lead to a medicalization of diet. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
health, ethics, genetic test, wellbeing, personalized nutrition, nutritional genomics
in
Genes & Nutrition
volume
1
issue
1
pages
13 - 22
publisher
BioMed Central (BMC)
external identifiers
  • pmid:18850217
  • wos:000258559300002
ISSN
1555-8932
DOI
10.1007/BF02829932
language
English
LU publication?
yes
additional info
The information about affiliations in this record was updated in December 2015. The record was previously connected to the following departments: Centre for Theology and Religious Studies (015017000)
id
f23b1005-9dd3-45e7-97e2-5d71cd202fc4 (old id 161880)
alternative location
http://www.newcenturyhealthpublishers.com/genes_and_nutrition/about/pdf/Gorman.pdf
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 11:56:47
date last changed
2018-11-21 20:02:02
@article{f23b1005-9dd3-45e7-97e2-5d71cd202fc4,
  abstract     = {Four principles are taken as basis for the ethical analysis: autonomy, nonmaleficence, beneficence, and justice. Health is understood as a limited aspect of wellbeing. Food is understood as an aspect of wellbeing, not only an instrument for health. Modern society is characterized by a tendency to identify wellbeing with external rather than subjective circumstances, to identify wellbeing with health, and to create exaggerated health expectations. Based upon this understanding, aspects of personalized nutrition are discussed: genetic testing, counselling, and fabrication of special dietary products. Today the predictive value of genetic tests for personal nutrition is limited, and experimental at best. Recommendations for the future: Personalized nutrition must be based on solid knowledge. Phenotypic analyses should be used when adequate. When a genetic test can have a clear advantage, this should be preferred. Opportunistic screening should only be used when clearly beneficial. Information concerning genetic tests, and counselling, should be made on a personal basis by specially trained persons. Marketing of genetic tests directly sold to the public should be discouraged. Fabrication of special products for personalized nutrition may be necessary in some cases. However, this may also lead to a medicalization of diet.},
  author       = {Görman, Ulf},
  issn         = {1555-8932},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {13--22},
  publisher    = {BioMed Central (BMC)},
  series       = {Genes & Nutrition},
  title        = {Ethical Issues raised by Personalized Nutrition based on Genetic Information},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF02829932},
  doi          = {10.1007/BF02829932},
  volume       = {1},
  year         = {2006},
}