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Antibiotic Containing Bone Substitute in Major Hip Surgery : A Long Term Gentamicin Elution Study

Stravinskas, Mindaugas; Nilsson, Malin; Horstmann, Peter; Petersen, Michael Mørk; Tarasevicius, Sarunas LU and Lidgren, Lars LU (2018) In Journal of bone and joint infection 3(2). p.68-72
Abstract

Objectives: The objective is to present the antibiotic elution from a locally implanted gentamicin containing hydroxyapatite and calcium sulphate bone substitute with an extended follow up of 30 days. We also compare the pharmacokinetics of the ceramic bone substitute with a published study on gentamicin containing poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) bone cement used in primary total hip arthroplasty. Methods: Gentamicin release was measured in the urine for a month and the serum for 4 days in 10 patients operated for trochanteric hip fractures and 10 patients in uncemented hip revisions. 17 patients were followed up at one year and 3 patients at 6 months. Results and Discussion: The gentamicin concentrations measured in serum were low... (More)

Objectives: The objective is to present the antibiotic elution from a locally implanted gentamicin containing hydroxyapatite and calcium sulphate bone substitute with an extended follow up of 30 days. We also compare the pharmacokinetics of the ceramic bone substitute with a published study on gentamicin containing poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) bone cement used in primary total hip arthroplasty. Methods: Gentamicin release was measured in the urine for a month and the serum for 4 days in 10 patients operated for trochanteric hip fractures and 10 patients in uncemented hip revisions. 17 patients were followed up at one year and 3 patients at 6 months. Results and Discussion: The gentamicin concentrations measured in serum were low and approximately 100 times less than in urine during the first days, indicating high local concentrations at the implant site. The elution from the biphasic bone substitute showed a stronger burst and higher gentamicin concentrations for the first week compared to that reported for PMMA used in hip arthroplasty. Also, for the bone substitute a complete gentamicin elution was obtained after 30 days, while for the PMMA cement sub-inhibitory MIC levels of gentamicin were still present in urine 60 days past surgery. No infections were detected. Conclusions: A new biphasic bone substitute containing antibiotics could potentially be used to prevent infection in patients treated for trochanteric hip fractures or uncemented hip revisions. The gentamicin elution from the bone substitute is efficient with high initial local gentamicin concentrations and complete release at 30 days.

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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of bone and joint infection
volume
3
issue
2
pages
5 pages
ISSN
2206-3552
DOI
10.7150/jbji.23901
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
162825f6-0306-43d3-b9eb-420e499aa9cb
date added to LUP
2019-06-11 14:03:42
date last changed
2019-06-12 13:08:15
@article{162825f6-0306-43d3-b9eb-420e499aa9cb,
  abstract     = {<p>Objectives: The objective is to present the antibiotic elution from a locally implanted gentamicin containing hydroxyapatite and calcium sulphate bone substitute with an extended follow up of 30 days. We also compare the pharmacokinetics of the ceramic bone substitute with a published study on gentamicin containing poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) bone cement used in primary total hip arthroplasty. Methods: Gentamicin release was measured in the urine for a month and the serum for 4 days in 10 patients operated for trochanteric hip fractures and 10 patients in uncemented hip revisions. 17 patients were followed up at one year and 3 patients at 6 months. Results and Discussion: The gentamicin concentrations measured in serum were low and approximately 100 times less than in urine during the first days, indicating high local concentrations at the implant site. The elution from the biphasic bone substitute showed a stronger burst and higher gentamicin concentrations for the first week compared to that reported for PMMA used in hip arthroplasty. Also, for the bone substitute a complete gentamicin elution was obtained after 30 days, while for the PMMA cement sub-inhibitory MIC levels of gentamicin were still present in urine 60 days past surgery. No infections were detected. Conclusions: A new biphasic bone substitute containing antibiotics could potentially be used to prevent infection in patients treated for trochanteric hip fractures or uncemented hip revisions. The gentamicin elution from the bone substitute is efficient with high initial local gentamicin concentrations and complete release at 30 days.</p>},
  author       = {Stravinskas, Mindaugas and Nilsson, Malin and Horstmann, Peter and Petersen, Michael Mørk and Tarasevicius, Sarunas and Lidgren, Lars},
  issn         = {2206-3552},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {68--72},
  series       = {Journal of bone and joint infection},
  title        = {Antibiotic Containing Bone Substitute in Major Hip Surgery : A Long Term Gentamicin Elution Study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.7150/jbji.23901},
  volume       = {3},
  year         = {2018},
}