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A role for ecology in male mate discrimination of immigrant females in Calopteryx damselflies?

Wellenreuther, Maren LU ; Vercken, Elodie and Svensson, Erik LU (2010) In Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 100(3). p.506-518
Abstract
Sexual selection against immigrants is a mechanism that can regulate premating isolation between populations but, so far, few field studies have examined whether males can discriminate between immigrant and resident females. Males of the damselfly Calopteryx splendens show mate preferences and are able to force pre-copulatory tandems. We related male mate responses to the ecological characteristics of female origin, geographic distances between populations, and morphological traits of females to identify factors influencing male mate discrimination. Significant heterogeneity between populations in male mate responses towards females was found. In some populations, males discriminated strongly against immigrant females, whereas the pattern... (More)
Sexual selection against immigrants is a mechanism that can regulate premating isolation between populations but, so far, few field studies have examined whether males can discriminate between immigrant and resident females. Males of the damselfly Calopteryx splendens show mate preferences and are able to force pre-copulatory tandems. We related male mate responses to the ecological characteristics of female origin, geographic distances between populations, and morphological traits of females to identify factors influencing male mate discrimination. Significant heterogeneity between populations in male mate responses towards females was found. In some populations, males discriminated strongly against immigrant females, whereas the pattern was reversed or nonsignificant in other populations. Immigrant females were particularly attractive to males when they came from populations with similar predation pressures and densities of conspecifics. By contrast, immigrant females from populations with strongly dissimilar predation pressures and conspecific densities were not attractive to males. Differences in the abiotic environment appeared to affect mating success to a lesser degree. This suggests that male mate discrimination is context-dependent and influenced by ecological differences between populations, a key prediction of ecological speciation theory. The results obtained in the present study suggest that gene-flow is facilitated between ecologically similar populations. (C) 2010 The Linnean Society of London, Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, 2010, 100, 506-518. (Less)
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author
organization
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
adaptation, local, genetic variation, adaptive divergence, ecological speciation, premating isolation, male mate choice
in
Biological Journal of the Linnean Society
volume
100
issue
3
pages
506 - 518
publisher
Linnean Society of London
external identifiers
  • wos:000279401800003
  • scopus:77954381968
ISSN
0024-4066
DOI
10.1111/j.1095-8312.2010.01464.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ff890685-85b8-42ec-b190-0b4bacd676c5 (old id 1629340)
date added to LUP
2010-07-22 11:01:05
date last changed
2018-05-29 10:21:19
@article{ff890685-85b8-42ec-b190-0b4bacd676c5,
  abstract     = {Sexual selection against immigrants is a mechanism that can regulate premating isolation between populations but, so far, few field studies have examined whether males can discriminate between immigrant and resident females. Males of the damselfly Calopteryx splendens show mate preferences and are able to force pre-copulatory tandems. We related male mate responses to the ecological characteristics of female origin, geographic distances between populations, and morphological traits of females to identify factors influencing male mate discrimination. Significant heterogeneity between populations in male mate responses towards females was found. In some populations, males discriminated strongly against immigrant females, whereas the pattern was reversed or nonsignificant in other populations. Immigrant females were particularly attractive to males when they came from populations with similar predation pressures and densities of conspecifics. By contrast, immigrant females from populations with strongly dissimilar predation pressures and conspecific densities were not attractive to males. Differences in the abiotic environment appeared to affect mating success to a lesser degree. This suggests that male mate discrimination is context-dependent and influenced by ecological differences between populations, a key prediction of ecological speciation theory. The results obtained in the present study suggest that gene-flow is facilitated between ecologically similar populations. (C) 2010 The Linnean Society of London, Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, 2010, 100, 506-518.},
  author       = {Wellenreuther, Maren and Vercken, Elodie and Svensson, Erik},
  issn         = {0024-4066},
  keyword      = {adaptation,local,genetic variation,adaptive divergence,ecological speciation,premating isolation,male mate choice},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {506--518},
  publisher    = {Linnean Society of London},
  series       = {Biological Journal of the Linnean Society},
  title        = {A role for ecology in male mate discrimination of immigrant females in Calopteryx damselflies?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1095-8312.2010.01464.x},
  volume       = {100},
  year         = {2010},
}