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Arterial and venous thrombosis in monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and multiple myeloma: a population-based study

Kristinsson, Sigurdur Y.; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Bjorkholm, Magnus; Goldin, Lynn R.; Schulman, Sam; Blimark, Cecilie; Mellqvist, Ulf-Henrik; Wahlin, Anders; Turesson, Ingemar LU and Landgren, Ola (2010) In Blood 115(24). p.4991-4998
Abstract
Patients with multiple myeloma (MM) have an increased risk of venous thrombosis. Interestingly, excess risk of venous thromboembolism has been observed among patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). Using population-based data from Sweden, we assessed the risks of venous and arterial thrombosis in 18 627 MM and 5326 MGUS patients diagnosed from 1958 to 2006, compared with 70 991 and 20 161 matched controls, respectively. At 1, 5, and 10 years after MM diagnosis, there was an increased risk of venous thrombosis: hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) were 7.5 (6.4-8.9), 4.6 (4.1-5.1), and 4.1 (3.8-4.5), respectively. The corresponding results for arterial thrombosis were 1.9 (1.8-2.1), 1.5 (1.4-1.6), and... (More)
Patients with multiple myeloma (MM) have an increased risk of venous thrombosis. Interestingly, excess risk of venous thromboembolism has been observed among patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). Using population-based data from Sweden, we assessed the risks of venous and arterial thrombosis in 18 627 MM and 5326 MGUS patients diagnosed from 1958 to 2006, compared with 70 991 and 20 161 matched controls, respectively. At 1, 5, and 10 years after MM diagnosis, there was an increased risk of venous thrombosis: hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) were 7.5 (6.4-8.9), 4.6 (4.1-5.1), and 4.1 (3.8-4.5), respectively. The corresponding results for arterial thrombosis were 1.9 (1.8-2.1), 1.5 (1.4-1.6), and 1.5 (1.4-1.5). At 1, 5, and 10 years after MGUS diagnosis, hazard ratios were 3.4 (2.5-4.6), 2.1 (1.7-2.5), and 2.1 (1.8-2.4) for venous thrombosis. The corresponding risks for arterial thrombosis were 1.7 (1.5-1.9), 1.3 (1.2-1.4), and 1.3 (1.3-1.4). IgG/IgA (but not IgM) MGUS patients had increased risks for venous and arterial thrombosis. Risks for thrombosis did not vary by M-protein concentration (> 10.0 g/L or < 10.0 g/L) at diagnosis. MGUS patients with (vs without) thrombosis had no excess risk of MM or Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia. Our findings are of relevance for future studies and for improvement of thrombosis prophylaxis strategies. (Blood. 2010;115(24):4991-4998) (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Blood
volume
115
issue
24
pages
4991 - 4998
publisher
American Society of Hematology
external identifiers
  • wos:000278888900006
  • scopus:77954678537
ISSN
1528-0020
DOI
10.1182/blood-2009-11-252072
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
220f58f8-906c-4f7f-aca2-f088abef8987 (old id 1630502)
date added to LUP
2010-07-22 14:05:34
date last changed
2018-06-17 03:35:58
@article{220f58f8-906c-4f7f-aca2-f088abef8987,
  abstract     = {Patients with multiple myeloma (MM) have an increased risk of venous thrombosis. Interestingly, excess risk of venous thromboembolism has been observed among patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). Using population-based data from Sweden, we assessed the risks of venous and arterial thrombosis in 18 627 MM and 5326 MGUS patients diagnosed from 1958 to 2006, compared with 70 991 and 20 161 matched controls, respectively. At 1, 5, and 10 years after MM diagnosis, there was an increased risk of venous thrombosis: hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) were 7.5 (6.4-8.9), 4.6 (4.1-5.1), and 4.1 (3.8-4.5), respectively. The corresponding results for arterial thrombosis were 1.9 (1.8-2.1), 1.5 (1.4-1.6), and 1.5 (1.4-1.5). At 1, 5, and 10 years after MGUS diagnosis, hazard ratios were 3.4 (2.5-4.6), 2.1 (1.7-2.5), and 2.1 (1.8-2.4) for venous thrombosis. The corresponding risks for arterial thrombosis were 1.7 (1.5-1.9), 1.3 (1.2-1.4), and 1.3 (1.3-1.4). IgG/IgA (but not IgM) MGUS patients had increased risks for venous and arterial thrombosis. Risks for thrombosis did not vary by M-protein concentration (&gt; 10.0 g/L or &lt; 10.0 g/L) at diagnosis. MGUS patients with (vs without) thrombosis had no excess risk of MM or Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia. Our findings are of relevance for future studies and for improvement of thrombosis prophylaxis strategies. (Blood. 2010;115(24):4991-4998)},
  author       = {Kristinsson, Sigurdur Y. and Pfeiffer, Ruth M. and Bjorkholm, Magnus and Goldin, Lynn R. and Schulman, Sam and Blimark, Cecilie and Mellqvist, Ulf-Henrik and Wahlin, Anders and Turesson, Ingemar and Landgren, Ola},
  issn         = {1528-0020},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {24},
  pages        = {4991--4998},
  publisher    = {American Society of Hematology},
  series       = {Blood},
  title        = {Arterial and venous thrombosis in monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and multiple myeloma: a population-based study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/blood-2009-11-252072},
  volume       = {115},
  year         = {2010},
}