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Screening history of women in Malmö with invasive cervical cancer.

Lindqvist, Pelle LU ; Hellsten, Charlotte LU and Rippe, Amanda (2008) In European Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology 137(1). p.77-83
Abstract
Objectives



Cervical cancer is one of the most common forms of cancer among women. Cytological screening and follow-up are potentially effective procedures for preventing the development of – and mortality from – cervical cancer. The purpose of this study was to investigate the screening history of women diagnosed with cervical cancer with the aim of improving the screening programme.

Study design



All of the 187 women diagnosed with invasive cervical cancer in Malmö between 1991 and 2000 were identified, and those below 61 years of age (n = 130) were included in the analysis. The cytological and histological screening history of these women prior to their diagnosis was scrutinized. We analyzed... (More)
Objectives



Cervical cancer is one of the most common forms of cancer among women. Cytological screening and follow-up are potentially effective procedures for preventing the development of – and mortality from – cervical cancer. The purpose of this study was to investigate the screening history of women diagnosed with cervical cancer with the aim of improving the screening programme.

Study design



All of the 187 women diagnosed with invasive cervical cancer in Malmö between 1991 and 2000 were identified, and those below 61 years of age (n = 130) were included in the analysis. The cytological and histological screening history of these women prior to their diagnosis was scrutinized. We analyzed shortcomings related to the cervical screening with special attention to participation defined as having had a cervical smear within 1 year of the scheduled time.

Results



Of the non-participants who developed cervical cancer (n = 70), roughly one-third “never participated,” half were “sub-optimal participants,” and one-sixth were “decliners,” i.e., women who declined the recommended measures. Among participants (n = 60), 80% were either “unexplained” (n = 35) or “misread as normal” (n = 13). The 9.5% subgroup of non-participants was at an 11-fold increased risk of being diagnosed with invasive cervical cancer.

Conclusion



The greatest reduction in cervical cancer would be realized if non-participants could be brought into the screening program. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
European Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology
volume
137
issue
1
pages
77 - 83
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000255533500014
  • scopus:43049149814
ISSN
0301-2115
DOI
10.1016/j.ejogrb.2006.12.005
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
cddb23a2-afe2-4781-bdc4-c6b616a0ec40 (old id 165103)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=17210219&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2007-07-25 15:52:04
date last changed
2017-01-01 05:10:48
@article{cddb23a2-afe2-4781-bdc4-c6b616a0ec40,
  abstract     = {Objectives<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Cervical cancer is one of the most common forms of cancer among women. Cytological screening and follow-up are potentially effective procedures for preventing the development of – and mortality from – cervical cancer. The purpose of this study was to investigate the screening history of women diagnosed with cervical cancer with the aim of improving the screening programme.<br/><br>
Study design<br/><br>
<br/><br>
All of the 187 women diagnosed with invasive cervical cancer in Malmö between 1991 and 2000 were identified, and those below 61 years of age (n = 130) were included in the analysis. The cytological and histological screening history of these women prior to their diagnosis was scrutinized. We analyzed shortcomings related to the cervical screening with special attention to participation defined as having had a cervical smear within 1 year of the scheduled time.<br/><br>
Results<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Of the non-participants who developed cervical cancer (n = 70), roughly one-third “never participated,” half were “sub-optimal participants,” and one-sixth were “decliners,” i.e., women who declined the recommended measures. Among participants (n = 60), 80% were either “unexplained” (n = 35) or “misread as normal” (n = 13). The 9.5% subgroup of non-participants was at an 11-fold increased risk of being diagnosed with invasive cervical cancer.<br/><br>
Conclusion<br/><br>
<br/><br>
The greatest reduction in cervical cancer would be realized if non-participants could be brought into the screening program.},
  author       = {Lindqvist, Pelle and Hellsten, Charlotte and Rippe, Amanda},
  issn         = {0301-2115},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {77--83},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {European Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology},
  title        = {Screening history of women in Malmö with invasive cervical cancer.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejogrb.2006.12.005},
  volume       = {137},
  year         = {2008},
}