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Risk of schizophrenia in second-generation immigrants: a Danish population-based cohort study.

Cantor-Graae, Elizabeth LU and Pedersen, Carsten B (2007) In Psychological Medicine 37(4). p.485-494
Abstract
Background. Urban birth, a risk factor for schizophrenia, is more frequent among secondgeneration

immigrants. The aim of the current study was to determine whether the increased risk

for schizophrenia found in second-generation immigrants is explained by the degree of urbanization

of birthplace and/or factors related to parentage, such as geographic origin or history of residence

abroad during upbringing.

Method. Using data from the Danish Civil Registration System (CRS), we established a

population-based cohort of 2.0 million Danes (persons born in Denmark). Schizophrenia in cohort

members was identified by cross-linkage with the Danish Psychiatric Central Register.

... (More)
Background. Urban birth, a risk factor for schizophrenia, is more frequent among secondgeneration

immigrants. The aim of the current study was to determine whether the increased risk

for schizophrenia found in second-generation immigrants is explained by the degree of urbanization

of birthplace and/or factors related to parentage, such as geographic origin or history of residence

abroad during upbringing.

Method. Using data from the Danish Civil Registration System (CRS), we established a

population-based cohort of 2.0 million Danes (persons born in Denmark). Schizophrenia in cohort

members was identified by cross-linkage with the Danish Psychiatric Central Register.

Results. The relative risk of developing schizophrenia was 1.93 [95% confidence interval (CI)

1.79–2.08] and 2.96 (95% CI 2.49–3.51) among persons with one or both parents foreign-born

respectively compared to native Danes. Adjustment for urbanization of birthplace and parental

characteristics reduced these risks slightly. However, urbanization had a lesser effect in secondgeneration

immigrants than in Danes. History of residence abroad was a risk factor for schizophrenia,

regardless of whether parents were foreign-born or native Danes.

Conclusion. The increased risk found in second-generation immigrants cannot be explained by

urbanization or parental characteristics pertaining to age, mental illness, geographic origin or

residence abroad during a child’s upbringing. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Psychological Medicine
volume
37
issue
4
pages
485 - 494
publisher
Cambridge University Press
external identifiers
  • wos:000245535900004
  • scopus:33847706988
ISSN
1469-8978
DOI
10.1017/S0033291706009652
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
8b958c25-ade6-4ea7-b770-1ee036d0fefc (old id 165160)
date added to LUP
2007-07-24 11:45:05
date last changed
2017-05-21 03:42:30
@article{8b958c25-ade6-4ea7-b770-1ee036d0fefc,
  abstract     = {Background. Urban birth, a risk factor for schizophrenia, is more frequent among secondgeneration<br/><br>
immigrants. The aim of the current study was to determine whether the increased risk<br/><br>
for schizophrenia found in second-generation immigrants is explained by the degree of urbanization<br/><br>
of birthplace and/or factors related to parentage, such as geographic origin or history of residence<br/><br>
abroad during upbringing.<br/><br>
Method. Using data from the Danish Civil Registration System (CRS), we established a<br/><br>
population-based cohort of 2.0 million Danes (persons born in Denmark). Schizophrenia in cohort<br/><br>
members was identified by cross-linkage with the Danish Psychiatric Central Register.<br/><br>
Results. The relative risk of developing schizophrenia was 1.93 [95% confidence interval (CI)<br/><br>
1.79–2.08] and 2.96 (95% CI 2.49–3.51) among persons with one or both parents foreign-born<br/><br>
respectively compared to native Danes. Adjustment for urbanization of birthplace and parental<br/><br>
characteristics reduced these risks slightly. However, urbanization had a lesser effect in secondgeneration<br/><br>
immigrants than in Danes. History of residence abroad was a risk factor for schizophrenia,<br/><br>
regardless of whether parents were foreign-born or native Danes.<br/><br>
Conclusion. The increased risk found in second-generation immigrants cannot be explained by<br/><br>
urbanization or parental characteristics pertaining to age, mental illness, geographic origin or<br/><br>
residence abroad during a child’s upbringing.},
  author       = {Cantor-Graae, Elizabeth and Pedersen, Carsten B},
  issn         = {1469-8978},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {485--494},
  publisher    = {Cambridge University Press},
  series       = {Psychological Medicine},
  title        = {Risk of schizophrenia in second-generation immigrants: a Danish population-based cohort study.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0033291706009652},
  volume       = {37},
  year         = {2007},
}