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Benchmark dose for cadmium-induced osteoporosis in women

Suwazono, Yasushi; Sand, Salomon; Vahter, Marie; Skerfving, Staffan LU ; Lidfeldt, Jonas LU and Akesson, Agneta (2010) In Toxicology Letters 197(2). p.123-127
Abstract
We applied a hybrid approach to estimate the benchmark dose (BMD) and the lower 95% confidence limit (BMDL) for cadmium-induced bone effects in a population with low environmental exposure. Morning urine samples were collected by 794 Swedish women, aged 53-64 years, participating in a population-based study We measured urinary cadmium (U-Cd), a marker of long-term exposure, and bone mineral density, expressed as its T-score (reference 20-year old women) of the non-dominant wrist. BMD and BMDL, adjusted for relevant covariates. corresponding to an additional risk (BMR) of 5% or 10% were calculated, with the background risk at zero exposure set at 1% or 5%. With a BMR of 5% and a background risk of having low bone mineral density (at U-Cd=0)... (More)
We applied a hybrid approach to estimate the benchmark dose (BMD) and the lower 95% confidence limit (BMDL) for cadmium-induced bone effects in a population with low environmental exposure. Morning urine samples were collected by 794 Swedish women, aged 53-64 years, participating in a population-based study We measured urinary cadmium (U-Cd), a marker of long-term exposure, and bone mineral density, expressed as its T-score (reference 20-year old women) of the non-dominant wrist. BMD and BMDL, adjusted for relevant covariates. corresponding to an additional risk (BMR) of 5% or 10% were calculated, with the background risk at zero exposure set at 1% or 5%. With a BMR of 5% and a background risk of having low bone mineral density (at U-Cd=0) of 1% or 5% (corresponding to T-score cut-offs -2.75 and -2 09, respectively), the BMD of U-Cd ranged 1 8-3.7 mu g/g creatinine, and the BMDL ranged 1.0-2 1 mu g/g creatinine For a 5% BMR of osteoporosis (T-score < -2 5), the BMD was 29 mu g/g creatinine and the BMDL 1 6 mu g/g creatinine. The lowest obtained BMD of U-Cd for wrist bone mineral density was only slightly higher than the lowest reference concentration previously reported for cadmium-related kidney effects Our results provide additional scientific support for the low tolerably weekly intake (TWI) of cadmium set by the European Food Safety Authority in 2009. (C) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Osteoporosis, effect, Bone, Human, Environmental exposure, Benchmark dose, Continuous data, Risk assessment, Urinary cadmium
in
Toxicology Letters
volume
197
issue
2
pages
123 - 127
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000280052200009
  • scopus:77953962452
ISSN
1879-3169
DOI
10.1016/j.toxlet.2010.05.008
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
575511e9-7b54-4686-8394-a0e69d0d4d0c (old id 1654779)
date added to LUP
2010-08-25 15:34:26
date last changed
2018-06-17 04:08:20
@article{575511e9-7b54-4686-8394-a0e69d0d4d0c,
  abstract     = {We applied a hybrid approach to estimate the benchmark dose (BMD) and the lower 95% confidence limit (BMDL) for cadmium-induced bone effects in a population with low environmental exposure. Morning urine samples were collected by 794 Swedish women, aged 53-64 years, participating in a population-based study We measured urinary cadmium (U-Cd), a marker of long-term exposure, and bone mineral density, expressed as its T-score (reference 20-year old women) of the non-dominant wrist. BMD and BMDL, adjusted for relevant covariates. corresponding to an additional risk (BMR) of 5% or 10% were calculated, with the background risk at zero exposure set at 1% or 5%. With a BMR of 5% and a background risk of having low bone mineral density (at U-Cd=0) of 1% or 5% (corresponding to T-score cut-offs -2.75 and -2 09, respectively), the BMD of U-Cd ranged 1 8-3.7 mu g/g creatinine, and the BMDL ranged 1.0-2 1 mu g/g creatinine For a 5% BMR of osteoporosis (T-score &lt; -2 5), the BMD was 29 mu g/g creatinine and the BMDL 1 6 mu g/g creatinine. The lowest obtained BMD of U-Cd for wrist bone mineral density was only slightly higher than the lowest reference concentration previously reported for cadmium-related kidney effects Our results provide additional scientific support for the low tolerably weekly intake (TWI) of cadmium set by the European Food Safety Authority in 2009. (C) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved},
  author       = {Suwazono, Yasushi and Sand, Salomon and Vahter, Marie and Skerfving, Staffan and Lidfeldt, Jonas and Akesson, Agneta},
  issn         = {1879-3169},
  keyword      = {Osteoporosis,effect,Bone,Human,Environmental exposure,Benchmark dose,Continuous data,Risk assessment,Urinary cadmium},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {123--127},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Toxicology Letters},
  title        = {Benchmark dose for cadmium-induced osteoporosis in women},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.toxlet.2010.05.008},
  volume       = {197},
  year         = {2010},
}