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Occupational engagement in persons with schizophrenia: relationships to self-related variables, psychopathology, and quality of life.

Bejerholm, Ulrika LU and Eklund, Mona LU (2007) In American Journal of Occupational Therapy 61(1). p.21-32
Abstract
Previous research suggests that having schizophrenia involves not being fully equipped to engage in daily occupations. This study was aimed at exploring relationships between occupational engagement and the issues of self-related variables, psychiatric symptoms, and quality of life. Seventy-four outpatients with schizophrenia entered the study. Instruments used in this study were Profile of Occupational Engagement in People with Schizophrenia, Locus of Control, Mastery, Sense of Coherence, Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale, and Lancashire Quality of Life Profile. The results showed that a high level of occupational engagement was related to higher ratings of self-related variables, fewer psychiatric symptoms, and better ratings of quality of... (More)
Previous research suggests that having schizophrenia involves not being fully equipped to engage in daily occupations. This study was aimed at exploring relationships between occupational engagement and the issues of self-related variables, psychiatric symptoms, and quality of life. Seventy-four outpatients with schizophrenia entered the study. Instruments used in this study were Profile of Occupational Engagement in People with Schizophrenia, Locus of Control, Mastery, Sense of Coherence, Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale, and Lancashire Quality of Life Profile. The results showed that a high level of occupational engagement was related to higher ratings of self-related variables, fewer psychiatric symptoms, and better ratings of quality of life, and vice versa. A significant difference and a linear trend were found among the three subgroups of different levels of occupational engagement and the estimated variables. In the regression model, negative symptoms and internal locus of control together explained 47% of the variance in occupational engagement. The results add a new dimension to understanding mental health and suggest the importance of assessing the level of occupational engagement. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
quality of life, occupation, mental health, self, schizophrenia
in
American Journal of Occupational Therapy
volume
61
issue
1
pages
21 - 32
publisher
American Occupational Therapy Association
external identifiers
  • wos:000243782300003
  • scopus:33847714118
ISSN
0272-9490
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
1ffaf465-9d37-46b4-aa6e-8c15d90cf135 (old id 165708)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=17302102&dopt=Abstract
http://www1.aota.org/ajot/abstract.asp?IVol=61&INum=1&ArtID=3&Date=Jan/Feb%202007
date added to LUP
2007-07-12 12:39:48
date last changed
2017-11-19 03:37:51
@article{1ffaf465-9d37-46b4-aa6e-8c15d90cf135,
  abstract     = {Previous research suggests that having schizophrenia involves not being fully equipped to engage in daily occupations. This study was aimed at exploring relationships between occupational engagement and the issues of self-related variables, psychiatric symptoms, and quality of life. Seventy-four outpatients with schizophrenia entered the study. Instruments used in this study were Profile of Occupational Engagement in People with Schizophrenia, Locus of Control, Mastery, Sense of Coherence, Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale, and Lancashire Quality of Life Profile. The results showed that a high level of occupational engagement was related to higher ratings of self-related variables, fewer psychiatric symptoms, and better ratings of quality of life, and vice versa. A significant difference and a linear trend were found among the three subgroups of different levels of occupational engagement and the estimated variables. In the regression model, negative symptoms and internal locus of control together explained 47% of the variance in occupational engagement. The results add a new dimension to understanding mental health and suggest the importance of assessing the level of occupational engagement.},
  author       = {Bejerholm, Ulrika and Eklund, Mona},
  issn         = {0272-9490},
  keyword      = {quality of life,occupation,mental health,self,schizophrenia},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {21--32},
  publisher    = {American Occupational Therapy Association},
  series       = {American Journal of Occupational Therapy},
  title        = {Occupational engagement in persons with schizophrenia: relationships to self-related variables, psychopathology, and quality of life.},
  volume       = {61},
  year         = {2007},
}