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DNA gel particles

Moran, M. Carmen; Miguel, M. Graca and Lindman, Björn LU (2010) In Soft Matter 6(14). p.3143-3156
Abstract
This review covers recent developments on the topic of DNA gel particles formed in water-water emulsion-type interfaces. A general understanding of interactions between DNA and oppositely charged agents has given us a basis for developing novel DNA-based materials, including gel particles. The association strength, which is tuned by varying the chemical structure of the cationic cosolute, determines the spatial homogeneity of the gelation process, creating DNA reservoir devices and DNA matrix devices that can be designed to release DNA (either single- (ssDNA) or double-stranded (dsDNA)). Besides an introduction concerning general aspects about DNA-cationic complexes and the formation of gels in water-water emulsion-type interfaces and some... (More)
This review covers recent developments on the topic of DNA gel particles formed in water-water emulsion-type interfaces. A general understanding of interactions between DNA and oppositely charged agents has given us a basis for developing novel DNA-based materials, including gel particles. The association strength, which is tuned by varying the chemical structure of the cationic cosolute, determines the spatial homogeneity of the gelation process, creating DNA reservoir devices and DNA matrix devices that can be designed to release DNA (either single- (ssDNA) or double-stranded (dsDNA)). Besides an introduction concerning general aspects about DNA-cationic complexes and the formation of gels in water-water emulsion-type interfaces and some conclusions, the review contains sections reviewing the preparation of DNA gel particles using 1) surfactants, 2) polysaccharides and 3) proteins. The particle morphology, swelling/dissolution behaviour, degree of DNA entrapment and DNA release responses as a function of the nature of the cationic agent used are discussed. Finally, current directions on the preparation of DNA gel particles, including the decrease of size and the improvement of the biocompatibility of these systems have been reviewed. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Soft Matter
volume
6
issue
14
pages
3143 - 3156
publisher
Royal Society of Chemistry
external identifiers
  • wos:000279566800004
  • scopus:77954568814
ISSN
1744-6848
DOI
10.1039/b923873e
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
3de356f4-ddfd-4525-9e0b-f2dd0a82dcb7 (old id 1657727)
date added to LUP
2010-08-24 11:50:20
date last changed
2018-05-29 11:49:34
@article{3de356f4-ddfd-4525-9e0b-f2dd0a82dcb7,
  abstract     = {This review covers recent developments on the topic of DNA gel particles formed in water-water emulsion-type interfaces. A general understanding of interactions between DNA and oppositely charged agents has given us a basis for developing novel DNA-based materials, including gel particles. The association strength, which is tuned by varying the chemical structure of the cationic cosolute, determines the spatial homogeneity of the gelation process, creating DNA reservoir devices and DNA matrix devices that can be designed to release DNA (either single- (ssDNA) or double-stranded (dsDNA)). Besides an introduction concerning general aspects about DNA-cationic complexes and the formation of gels in water-water emulsion-type interfaces and some conclusions, the review contains sections reviewing the preparation of DNA gel particles using 1) surfactants, 2) polysaccharides and 3) proteins. The particle morphology, swelling/dissolution behaviour, degree of DNA entrapment and DNA release responses as a function of the nature of the cationic agent used are discussed. Finally, current directions on the preparation of DNA gel particles, including the decrease of size and the improvement of the biocompatibility of these systems have been reviewed.},
  author       = {Moran, M. Carmen and Miguel, M. Graca and Lindman, Björn},
  issn         = {1744-6848},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {14},
  pages        = {3143--3156},
  publisher    = {Royal Society of Chemistry},
  series       = {Soft Matter},
  title        = {DNA gel particles},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/b923873e},
  volume       = {6},
  year         = {2010},
}