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Cytonuclear Interactions and the Economics of Mating in Seed Beetles

Dowling, Damian K.; Meerupati, Tejashwari LU and Arnqvist, Goran (2010) In American Naturalist 176(2). p.131-140
Abstract
Recent studies have uncovered an abundance of non-neutral cytoplasmic genetic variation within species, which suggests that we should no longer consider the cytoplasm an idle intermediary of evolutionary change. Nonneutrality of cytoplasmic genomes is particularly intriguing, given that these genomes are maternally transmitted. This means that the fate of any given cytoplasmic genetic mutation is directly tied to its performance when expressed in females. For this reason, it has been hypothesized that cytoplasmic genes will coevolve via a sexually antagonistic arms race with the biparentally transmitted nuclear genes with which they interact. We assess this prediction, examining the intergenomic contributions to the costs and benefits of... (More)
Recent studies have uncovered an abundance of non-neutral cytoplasmic genetic variation within species, which suggests that we should no longer consider the cytoplasm an idle intermediary of evolutionary change. Nonneutrality of cytoplasmic genomes is particularly intriguing, given that these genomes are maternally transmitted. This means that the fate of any given cytoplasmic genetic mutation is directly tied to its performance when expressed in females. For this reason, it has been hypothesized that cytoplasmic genes will coevolve via a sexually antagonistic arms race with the biparentally transmitted nuclear genes with which they interact. We assess this prediction, examining the intergenomic contributions to the costs and benefits of mating in Callosobruchus maculatus females subjected to a mating treatment with three classes (kept virgin, mated once, or forced to cohabit with a male). We find no evidence that the economics of mating are determined by interactions between cytoplasmic genes expressed in females and nuclear genes expressed in males and, therefore, no support for a sexually antagonistic intergenomic arms race. The cost of mating to females was, however, shaped by an interaction between the cytoplasmic and nuclear genes expressed within females. Thus, cytonuclear interactions are embroiled in the economics of mating. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
cost of mating, cytonuclear, cytoplasm, mitochondrial DNA, evolution, sexual conflict
in
American Naturalist
volume
176
issue
2
pages
131 - 140
publisher
University of Chicago Press
external identifiers
  • wos:000279602900005
  • scopus:77955625543
ISSN
0003-0147
DOI
10.1086/653671
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
26a0cf77-12a1-4cb9-b0b9-1454f7585043 (old id 1658085)
date added to LUP
2010-08-20 08:57:34
date last changed
2018-07-01 03:01:53
@article{26a0cf77-12a1-4cb9-b0b9-1454f7585043,
  abstract     = {Recent studies have uncovered an abundance of non-neutral cytoplasmic genetic variation within species, which suggests that we should no longer consider the cytoplasm an idle intermediary of evolutionary change. Nonneutrality of cytoplasmic genomes is particularly intriguing, given that these genomes are maternally transmitted. This means that the fate of any given cytoplasmic genetic mutation is directly tied to its performance when expressed in females. For this reason, it has been hypothesized that cytoplasmic genes will coevolve via a sexually antagonistic arms race with the biparentally transmitted nuclear genes with which they interact. We assess this prediction, examining the intergenomic contributions to the costs and benefits of mating in Callosobruchus maculatus females subjected to a mating treatment with three classes (kept virgin, mated once, or forced to cohabit with a male). We find no evidence that the economics of mating are determined by interactions between cytoplasmic genes expressed in females and nuclear genes expressed in males and, therefore, no support for a sexually antagonistic intergenomic arms race. The cost of mating to females was, however, shaped by an interaction between the cytoplasmic and nuclear genes expressed within females. Thus, cytonuclear interactions are embroiled in the economics of mating.},
  author       = {Dowling, Damian K. and Meerupati, Tejashwari and Arnqvist, Goran},
  issn         = {0003-0147},
  keyword      = {cost of mating,cytonuclear,cytoplasm,mitochondrial DNA,evolution,sexual conflict},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {131--140},
  publisher    = {University of Chicago Press},
  series       = {American Naturalist},
  title        = {Cytonuclear Interactions and the Economics of Mating in Seed Beetles},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/653671},
  volume       = {176},
  year         = {2010},
}