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Deoxyribonucleic acid of Chlamydia trachomatis in fresh tissue from the Fallopian tubes of patients with ectopic pregnancy.

Bjartling, Carina LU ; Osser, Stellan LU and Persson, Kenneth LU (2007) In European Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology 134(1). p.95-100
Abstract
Objectives: The role of persistent chlamydial infection of the Fallopian tubes in ectopic pregnancy is still unresolved. Therefore, we examined tissue of the Fallopian tubes from patients with ectopic pregnancy for the presence of Chlamydia trachomatis. In addition, other markers of C. trachomatis infection implicated in the pathogenesis of tubal damage were studied including antibodies to heat shock protein 60 of chlamydial and human origin. Study design: Fresh frozen tubal tissue from 55 patients with ectopic pregnancy in a hospital setting were examined for the presence of C. trachomatis DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and blood sample were analysed for antibodies to C. trachomatis including heat shock protein 60 (hsp60).... (More)
Objectives: The role of persistent chlamydial infection of the Fallopian tubes in ectopic pregnancy is still unresolved. Therefore, we examined tissue of the Fallopian tubes from patients with ectopic pregnancy for the presence of Chlamydia trachomatis. In addition, other markers of C. trachomatis infection implicated in the pathogenesis of tubal damage were studied including antibodies to heat shock protein 60 of chlamydial and human origin. Study design: Fresh frozen tubal tissue from 55 patients with ectopic pregnancy in a hospital setting were examined for the presence of C. trachomatis DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and blood sample were analysed for antibodies to C. trachomatis including heat shock protein 60 (hsp60). Results: Chlamydial DNA was not detected in any of the 55 tubal specimens using a commercial test, Cobas Amplicor, Roche, and an in-house real time PCR able to detect a few copies of the organism. Logistic regression showed that chlamydial IgG antibodies were more common in a subgroup of patients with previous PID than in controls (OR = 7.84, CI 1.78-34.6). Specific antibodies to hsp60 of chlamydial (OR = 7.00, CI 1.50-32.6) but not of human origin (OR = 2.13, CI 0.14-31.6) were associated with ectopic pregnancy in this group. Conclusions: No evidence of persistent infection of C. trachomatis in the fallopian tubes at the time of ectopic pregnancy was found in this study. (C) 2006 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Chlamydia trachomatis, Fallopian tubes, heat shock, protein 60, ectopic pregnancy
in
European Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology
volume
134
issue
1
pages
95 - 100
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000250077500016
  • scopus:34548254423
ISSN
0301-2115
DOI
10.1016/j.ejogrb.2006.06.010
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
cf891f54-92fc-46bc-bf4d-bddaa72ebf76 (old id 165865)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=17280761&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2007-07-13 10:06:39
date last changed
2017-08-06 03:39:38
@article{cf891f54-92fc-46bc-bf4d-bddaa72ebf76,
  abstract     = {Objectives: The role of persistent chlamydial infection of the Fallopian tubes in ectopic pregnancy is still unresolved. Therefore, we examined tissue of the Fallopian tubes from patients with ectopic pregnancy for the presence of Chlamydia trachomatis. In addition, other markers of C. trachomatis infection implicated in the pathogenesis of tubal damage were studied including antibodies to heat shock protein 60 of chlamydial and human origin. Study design: Fresh frozen tubal tissue from 55 patients with ectopic pregnancy in a hospital setting were examined for the presence of C. trachomatis DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and blood sample were analysed for antibodies to C. trachomatis including heat shock protein 60 (hsp60). Results: Chlamydial DNA was not detected in any of the 55 tubal specimens using a commercial test, Cobas Amplicor, Roche, and an in-house real time PCR able to detect a few copies of the organism. Logistic regression showed that chlamydial IgG antibodies were more common in a subgroup of patients with previous PID than in controls (OR = 7.84, CI 1.78-34.6). Specific antibodies to hsp60 of chlamydial (OR = 7.00, CI 1.50-32.6) but not of human origin (OR = 2.13, CI 0.14-31.6) were associated with ectopic pregnancy in this group. Conclusions: No evidence of persistent infection of C. trachomatis in the fallopian tubes at the time of ectopic pregnancy was found in this study. (C) 2006 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Bjartling, Carina and Osser, Stellan and Persson, Kenneth},
  issn         = {0301-2115},
  keyword      = {Chlamydia trachomatis,Fallopian tubes,heat shock,protein 60,ectopic pregnancy},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {95--100},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {European Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology},
  title        = {Deoxyribonucleic acid of Chlamydia trachomatis in fresh tissue from the Fallopian tubes of patients with ectopic pregnancy.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejogrb.2006.06.010},
  volume       = {134},
  year         = {2007},
}